This  blog page offers you a convenient way to “quick-scroll” through recent Steve Fund updates.

Webinar (June 1, 2017): Impact of Campus and National Climate on Student Mental Health

Posted: May 16, 2017 8:00 pm
 

WEBINAR
Thursday, June 1st, 2017 from 2:00-3:00pm (EST)

Healthy Minds Network Webinar:
Impact of Campus and National Climate on Student Mental Health
Alfiee Breland-Noble, Ph.D., M.H.Sc.
Sara Abelson, M.P.H.
Joanne Ly
Becky Fein, M.P.H.

Join the University of Michigan and the Health Minds Network for its upcoming webinar on Thursday, June 1st from 2:00-3:00 pm EST, focused on the students’ mental health in today’s campus and national climates. The webinar will feature the Steve Fund’s Senior Scientific Adviser Dr. Alfiee Breland-Noble, as part of a panel of presenters from various professional backgrounds with unique experiences in understanding and advocating for the mental health of college students.

The presenters include: Alfiee Breland-Noble, Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Georgetown University Medical Center, Director of the AAKOMA Project, and Lab and Senior Scientific Adviser for the Steve Fund; Sara Abelson, Ph.D. student at University of Michigan School of Public Health, and Consultant to Active Minds, Inc.; Joanne Ly, Active Minds Outreach Chair and undergraduate student at University of California San Diego; and Becky Fein, the California Statewide Program Manager for Active Minds, Inc.

Together, the presenters bring a breadth of knowledge and a diverse range of crucial perspectives that can help us better understand and address the impact of today’s national and campus climates on students’ mental health.

Attendance free. Registration required.

Register here




A statement by the Steve Fund regarding the recent hate crime at AU

Posted: May 6, 2017 12:21 pm
 

A statement by the Steve Fund regarding the recent hate crime at American University

American University recently was the site of a hate crime toward African American students. Bananas were found hanging by rope in the shape of nooses in at least three locations on campus. Written on them were the letters “AKA” which represent Alpha Kappa Alpha, a sorority with predominantly African American members. The event happened the same day that the university’s first black female student government president, Taylor Dumpson, took office. She is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha.

The Steve Fund strongly condemns all hate crimes. This particular incident is a strong reminder of the need for colleges and universities to do much more in support of the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color. It speaks loudly to the need for universities to be more pro-active in the strategies and policies they use to contribute to the success of students of color.

The Steve Fund applauds American University for immediately calling this crime what it is: a hate crime. This initiated the involvement of the FBI along with campus police and the DC police much more rapidly. The incident shows that even a liberal and progressive institution like AU is not safe from such incidents. It is ironic that it took place during May, which is national mental health awareness month.

One cannot overestimate the amount of emotional stress such an incident exerts on students of color, even if they just read about it and even if it doesn’t happen on their own campus. Universities must implement focused strategies and dedicate sufficient resources in support of the emotional well-being of students of color. Research shows that differences in the ethnic background of students necessitate culturally specific approaches to supporting their mental health and emotional well-being. A Harris Poll conducted online in 2016 among 1,500 second-semester freshmen revealed that black students didn’t seek help as often as white students for their mental health concerns; white students were nearly twice as likely to report receiving a diagnosis of anxiety, depression, or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Three-quarters of black students said they tend to keep their feelings about the difficulties of college to themselves.

With support from the Knight Foundation, the Steve Fund has partnered with the Crisis Text Line to provide a text messaging service to improve the critically needed access for young people of color to crisis counseling. Young persons of color who feel down, stressed or overwhelmed can text “STEVE” to 741741 and a live, trained Crisis Counselor will receive the text and respond to them quickly to provide support.

The Steve Fund and The Jed Foundation have also partnered to create the Equal Chance at Mental Health Framework with expert-consensus recommendations for America’s colleges and universities to better support the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color. This framework is based on: a systematic literature review; a survey of existing evidence-based programs; expert input from mental health and higher education leaders; and a survey of more than 1,000 students.

The Equal Chance at Mental Health Framework will be released in 2017. To sign up for updates about this Framework, please visit http://www.equalchanceatmentalhealth.org/

With people of color forming the majority of Americans by 2044 (and for children already by 2020), the future success of our nation will depend on the mental health and emotional well-being of all student populations, and on colleges and universities to provide support appropriately.

The hate crime at American University is another reminder of the urgency and importance of taking action. Students of color deserve an equal chance at emotional well-being and mental health.





May is Mental Health Awareness Month

Posted: May 1, 2017 9:57 pm
 

May is Mental Health Awareness Month. Mental illnesses affect everybody, but certain groups, like certain students of color, are up to twice less likely to seek treatment.

Are you a young person of color? Feeling down, stressed or overwhelmed? Text STEVE to 741741 and a live, trained Crisis Counselor will receive the text and respond to you quickly to provide support. The volunteer Crisis Counselor will help you move from a hot moment to a cool moment.

With support from the Knight Foundation, the Steve Fund has partnered with Crisis Text Line to provide this text messaging service as a means to improve the critically needed access for young people of color to crisis counseling. The Fund views text messaging as a key component of its strategy towards addressing the unmet mental health needs of this population. The Steve Fund is now actively recruiting a group of young people of color into the Crisis Text Line training program to become crisis counselors on their platform. If you are interested in applying to be a Crisis Counselor, supporting the mental health needs of young people of color, please visit www.crisistextline.org/the-steve-fund or learn more here, apply to be a volunteer or download the Steve Fund Crisis Text Line Flyers here.

The Steve Fund is the nation’s only organization focused on the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color. Right at this moment, there are students of color who are failing academically, suffering emotionally and/OR in some cases are facing serious risk, because population-specific factors influencing mental health are too poorly understood and not acted upon.

The Steve Fund recently has:

 

To keep up to date and/or learn more about the Steve Fund’s activities, please sign up for our email updates here.





Dr. Terri Wright, Renowned Public Health Leader, Takes Helm at Steve Fund

Posted: April 5, 2017 7:20 pm
 

For immediate release

DR. TERRI WRIGHT, RENOWNED PUBLIC HEALTH LEADER, TAKES HELM AT NON-PROFIT FOCUSED ON MENTAL HEALTH OF STUDENTS OF COLOR

Terri D. Wright, PhD, MPH, a leading public health education and policy expert, has been named Executive Director of the Steve Fund, the nation’s only non-profit focused on the mental health of students of color.

NEW YORK, NY, April 6, 2017 — Terri D. Wright, PhD, MPH, an experienced and nationally renowned public health education and policy expert, has  joined the Steve Fund as the organization’s first Executive Director. The two-year-old non-profit is the nation’s only organization focused on the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color.

Most recently, Dr. Wright served as the Director of the Center for School, Health & Education and of the Center for Public Health Policy at the American Public Health Association. Prior to joining APHA in 2010, Dr. Wright served as a program director for health policy for the W. K. Kellogg Foundation for 12 years.  Dr. Wright has also served as Maternal and Child Health Director and Bureau Chief for Child and Family Services at the Michigan Department of Community Health in Lansing, Michigan.

Dr. Terri Wright, Executive Director, The Steve Fund (click for hi-resolution image)

Dr. Terri Wright, Executive Director, The Steve Fund (click for hi-resolution image)

“We have found a leader with the perfect background and combination of talents,” says Evan Rose, President of the Board of the Steve Fund. “Dr. Wright has worked all her life for a more equal chance at health for everybody, and I think we are lucky to have her incredible talents focus now on increasing mental health equity.”

“I am incredibly excited to join the Steve Fund at a time when leaders at colleges and universities are becoming increasingly aware of the urgency around mental health in the context of students of color, in large part because of the Steve Fund’s activities to date, but also because of the more intense national discourse around race and equity issues” says Dr. Wright. “There is a shift in awareness going on, and for the Steve Fund this constitutes a real opportunity to make a profound difference. I am also very happy personally to have this unique opportunity to expand on my past public health work involving students and families.”

Studies show that students of color at American colleges and universities are almost twice as likely to not seek help when they feel depressed or anxious. They also report more micro-aggressions than their European American counterparts. Only 49% of African Americans students complete their 4-year college education, compared to 71% of white, non-Hispanic students, according to a CollegeBoard report.

Recent activities of the Steve Fund include:

  • Collaborating with the JED Foundation on a framework of evidence-informed recommended practices for improving support for the mental health of students of color on college and university campuses. The project includes a Nielsen study with 1,000 college and university students. A draft version of the framework was recently discussed by 110 senior higher education leaders gathered at Morgan Stanley headquarters in New York. The results will be rolled out nationally in early 2017.
  • A partnership with Crisis Text Line, an online crisis support service, and with the Knight Foundation to enable students of color to text the keyword “Steve” to 741741 to be connected with a trained crisis counselor.
  • Steve Fund scholarships to young scholars to research psychological challenges confronting their respective populations, in cooperation with three notable U.S. mental health organizations.
  • A convening for more than 250 leaders in mental health and higher education for the third annual Young, Gifted & @Risk Conference in partnership with the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis last November.
  • Partnerships with organizations such as Sponsors for Educational Opportunity (SEO), the NAACP, and Management Leadership for Tomorrow as part of the Steve Fund’s efforts to bring mental health programming to organizations serving people of color.

In 2017, the Steve Fund plans to continue its focus on college students and to expand activities that support young people of color who are in transition from college to life beyond and their families.

About the Steve Fund

The Steve Fund is the nation’s only philanthropic organization focused on promoting the mental health and emotional well-being of young people of color. It prioritizes students transitioning into college, those enrolled in college, and young people transitioning from college into emerging adulthood. The Steve Fund uses programs, research, thought leadership, strategic partnerships, technology innovations and communications to stimulate dialogue and best practices that reduce stigma, build knowledge, and support assistance to its target group of young people. Enhancing the effectiveness of higher education institutions around the emotional and mental health of students from diverse families and communities is critical to the mission of the Steve Fund.

Learn more at http://www.stevefund.org.  Follow us on social media: Facebook | Twitter  | Blog

A high-resolution image of Dr. Terri Wright is available here.

Media Contact: Marc Fest, fest@atlanticpoint.com, 305-604-9500





Meet our latest Stephen S. Rose Legacy Scholar

Posted: March 8, 2017 8:49 pm
 
Khushbu Patel

Khushbu Patel

The Steve Fund is proud to announce the most recent winner of a Stephen C. Rose Legacy Scholarship: The winner of the 2017 Active Minds Stephen C. Rose Scholarship is Khushbu Patel, a second year Master’s student at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. A native of Philadelphia suburbs, she completed her Bachelor’s of Science in Psychology at Drexel University, while working in the Nezu Lab. She served as a Research Assistant on various projects, and as interim Project Manager for one year in a pilot RCT exploring the efficacy of Problem-Solving Therapy in hypertensive patients. Since then, she has worked as a Clinical Research Assistant with the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s Violence Prevention Initiative. In this role, she supported facilitation of an aggression-reduction program based in West and Southwest Philadelphia Public Schools. In her social work program, she is exploring many interests including U.S. urban public school systems, juvenile justice systems, and mental health research focusing on Asian American ethnic groups.

Khushbu received the Stephen C. Rose Legacy Scholarship for her project titled “Transgenerational Perceptions of Mental Health Among South Asians”. This project employs qualitative methodology to understand how culture influences the way South Asians conceptualize ‘mental health.’ There is a large body of literature on mental health stigma amongst South Asians, but little that looks at the cultural pathways that facilitate one’s understanding of mental health and well-being. Khushbu will focus on the college-aged South Asian population, where many are having their first wide-scale encounters with mental health resources, while statistically underutilizing them compared with peer groups – all while occupying a precarious position of increased suicidal risk.

Khushbu says she developed this project with short-term and long-term sets of goals, and through the fellowship she will tackle the former. For the short-term project framework, she aims to conduct semi-structured interviews with college-aged individuals and thematically analyze the qualitative data. The finished product would involve a brief “review of findings” paper and interactive presentation delivered on campus at the University of Chicago, particularly aimed at social workers. Ultimately she hopes to contribute to the body of work – in both academic literature and fiction writings – that explore South Asian mental health experiences.

The goal of The Stephen C. Rose Legacy Scholarships is to promote the emotional well-being and mental health of youth in ethnically diverse communities. By supporting competitive scholarships for research on the mental health challenges facing college students of color, the Fund is supporting the growth of a generation of scholars with knowledge and capacity to address the mental health needs of our target population. Find out more about the Fund’s scholarships here.





News article: Students of color at disproportionate risk for suicide

Posted: February 23, 2017 5:30 pm
 

In a news article, the Columbia Spectator reports on findings that students of color and international students are at a disproportionate risk for suicide. The article quotes Steve Fund Senior Media Advisor Dr. Annelle Primm, writing:

In particular, experts pointed to the additional stigma surrounding mental health for students of color. These students are 1.7 times less likely to see a mental health professional, according to Steve Fund Senior Medical Adviser Dr. Annelle Primm. Primm highlighted the notion of “impostor syndrome,” which involves feeling that seeking support undermines one’s success and self-worth. This syndrome is disproportionately common among students of color.

Read the full article here





Conference discusses draft of groundbreaking recommendations framework

Posted: February 15, 2017 7:52 pm
 
Evan Rose, president of the board of The Steve Fund, at the opening of the convening

Evan Rose, president of the board of The Steve Fund, at the opening of the convening

110 senior higher education leaders gathered on Monday, February 13, 2017 at Morgan Stanley headquarters in New York City to provide feedback on a draft version of a groundbreaking recommendations framework intended to help improve the support for the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color at America’s colleges and universities.

The invitation-only event was organized by the Steve Fund and the Jed Foundation, with generous underwriting support from the Morgan Stanley Foundation.
Jeffrey Brodsky, Chief Human Resources Officer, Morgan Stanley, welcomes attendees

Jeffrey Brodsky, Chief Human Resources Officer, Morgan Stanley, welcomes attendees

The Steve Fund and The Jed Foundation have partnered to create the Equal Chance at Mental Health Framework with evidence-informed expert recommendations for America’s colleges and universities to better support the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color. Too many students of color are failing academically, suffering emotionally and in some cases are facing serious risk, including death, because population-specific factors influencing their mental health are poorly understood. The Equal Chance at Mental Health Framework will be based on a systematic literature review, on a survey of existing evidence-based programs, on expert input from mental health and higher education leaders  and on a survey of more than 1,000 students.

The attendees got an early preview of the ten recommendations that will be at the core of the mental health framework that the Steve Fund and Jed plan to roll out later this year.
John MacPhee, CEO of the JED Foundation, welcomes attendees.

John MacPhee, CEO of the JED Foundation, welcome attendees.

Steve Fund senior medical advisor Dr. Annelle Primm set the stage with a presentation that made the case for the need to improve support for mental health and emotional well-being of students of color. She was followed by a presentation of the draft recommendations by the senior medical advisors to the Steve Fund and JED, Dr. Alfiee Breland-Noble and Dr. Victor Schwartz. A panel of four university presidents then provided their perspective and thoughts. The panel was moderated by Dr. Carlota Ocampo, Provost for Trinity Washington University. The panelists were:

Dr. John DeGioia, President of Georgetown University; Dr. Belinda S. Miles, President of Westchester Community College; Dr. John Silvanus Wilson Jr., President of Morehouse College; Dr. Robert L. Caret, Chancellor ofd the University System of Maryland; Dr. Carlota Ocampo, Provost for Trinity Washington University

Dr. John DeGioia, President of Georgetown University; Dr. Belinda S. Miles, President of Westchester Community College; Dr. John Silvanus Wilson Jr., President of Morehouse College; Dr. Robert L. Caret, Chancellor of the University System of Maryland; Dr. Carlota Ocampo, Provost of Trinity Washington University

  • Dr. John DeGioia, President of Georgetown University
  • Dr. Robert L. Caret, Chancellor of the University System of Maryland
  • Dr. John Silvanus Wilson Jr., President of Morehouse College
  • Dr. Belinda S. Miles, President of Westchester Community College
A facilitated discussion for conference attendees followed the panel to provide additional expert input on the framework and to share practical tips on implementing the recommendations on campuses. The discussions produced a number of ideas and important observations which the Steve Fund and Jed will incorporate into the final framework. Comments from the participants also highlighted the need for, importance of and excitement about the prospect of a clear and actionable recommendations framework that colleges and universities can implement to move the needle on supporting the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color.
If you would like to be notified when the framework will be released, please sign up for updates below.




Supporting the Black Solidarity Conference

Posted: February 12, 2017 9:50 pm
 

February is Black History Month. The Steve Fund is proud to be a Silver Sponsor at this year’s Black Solidarity Conference at Yale University. It is our third year of supporting this important convening.

We are now accepting applications for ideas for your campus! Please visit www.stevefund.org/ideas/ for the chance to bring an innovative program to your school.

Finally, in April, we will be accepting new applications for the Youth Advisory Board. Sign up for updates at http://www.stevefund.org/updates

The Black Solidarity Conference is a completely student-run annual conference.  BSC is the largest undergraduate conference held at Yale University and it continues to grow each year. BSC invites over 700 undergraduates of of various races, religions, ethnicities, and communities to discuss issues pertaining to the African Diaspora. Through discussions, panels, networking, and social gatherings, students from across the country analyze issues affecting the Black/Afro-Diasporic community and explore solutions that can be implemented on campus.





A Reflection on 2016

Posted: December 23, 2016 1:42 am
 

Dear friend,

“Your mission is becoming more urgent and important.” This is something we heard often in the beginning of 2016. At that time, every day, the media were full of reports about increasing tensions and protests, on campuses around the nation. Experts were beginning to warn about the mental health toll on young people of color who are exposed to this drumbeat of unsettling news.

“Your mission has just become so much more urgent and important,” we kept hearing again eleven months later, on November 11, 2016. We were at “Young, Gifted & @Risk”, the Steve Fund’s third annual national conference focused on supporting the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color taking place at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. The elections were over. And the media were full of reports about acts targeting communities of color, by individuals and groups who felt emboldened to say and do what seemed unacceptable in 21st-Century America until not too long ago.

Back in 2015, we didn’t create the Steve Fund because of developments on campus. We did not create it because of a general increase in ethnic tensions. But both these developments happened to intensify in 2016, our first year of “full operations”, if you will. We began the Steve Fund with a sense of urgency born of personal experience. But it is probably fair to say that these recent development have increased the urgency, for the people we serve, for our supporters, and for the Steve Fund.

If you are taking the time to read this, you are probably interested in and care about the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color. For this we thank you. If you have supported the Steve Fund’s work, whether financially or in other ways, we thank you. We thank you for everything you do to support this cause, whether through the Steve Fund, or through other channels available to you. It is important. And it is urgent. Thank you, so much!

The issue of students of color and their mental health and emotional well-being has been surging in the national discourse over the last year. Whether it is an edition of the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, the Atlantic or The New Yorker, there is a good chance you will find an article containing terms such as “microaggression”, “impostor syndrome”, “safe space” or “trigger warning.” This simply was not the case just a short while ago.

While this increased media attention generally is a positive thing, not all of it is positive. For instance, some universities have intentionally disavowed the thinking behind “safe spaces,” suggesting it is in conflict with a commitment to rigorous debate. At the Steve Fund, we believe this is a false equivalency. Some op-ed pieces in national publications poke fun at these serious issues. And just take a look at the often vitriolic reader comments that accompany the articles, and you get a sense of how much work there is to do.

Here are some highlights of the work the Steve Fund accomplished this year (the links in the parentheses offer more information about each item):

  • The JED Foundation and the Steve Fund are collaborating on a framework of evidence-informed recommended practices for improving support for the mental health of students of color on college and university campuses. The project includes a Nielsen study with 1,000 college and university students. The results will be rolled out nationally in early 2017. (mentalhealthframework.org)
  • A partnership with Crisis Text Line, an online crisis support service, and with the Knight Foundation now enables students of color to text the keyword “Steve” to 741741 to be connected with a trained crisis counselor. The Steve Fund also worked with Crisis Text Line to refine its training curriculum for counselors with regard to supporting the mental health of students of color. (http://bit.ly/2hW5EEP)
  • Three notable U.S. mental health associations have administered six Steve Fund scholarships to young scholars to research psychological challenges confronting their respective populations. (http://bit.ly/2hWfZRl)
  • Members of the newly formed Steve Fund Youth Advisory Board advise the fund and promote the importance of education about mental health and emotional well-being on college and university campuses and within their respective communities. (http://bit.ly/2hIXfSa)
  • The first-of-its-kind, online Knowledge Center with expert information related to the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color is now available free of charge at www.stevefund.org/knowledgecenter.
  • In partnership with the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis, the Steve Fund brought together more than 250 leaders in mental health and higher education for the third annual Young, Gifted & @Risk Conference on November 11. More than ten hours of expert knowledge coming out of the conference will be added to the Steve Fund Knowledge Center. (http://bit.ly/2eZMZq4)
  • A three-part Webinar series specifically aimed at families of students of color, discusses topics ranging from the unique pressures and challenges faced by students of color, to potential strategies for positive change. (http://bit.ly/2gP9RFf)
  • We worked with partners such as Sponsors for Educational Opportunity (SEO), the NAACP, and Management Leadership for Tomorrow as part of the Steve Fund’s efforts to bring mental health programming to organizations serving people of color. (http://bit.ly/2hfqtaa)
  • The social micro blogging platform Tumblr (550 million monthly users) chose the Steve Fund as one of three charitable partner organizations for its Mental Health Quilt project. The quilt is a collaboration between Tumblr and the City of New York. (http://bit.ly/2hfnI8W)
  • Articles in publications such as the Wall Street Journal, the Chronicle of Higher Education, The Atlantic, Inside Higher Ed, Slate Magazine, Black Enterprise Magazine, and Onyx reported on the Steve Fund’s work. (http://stevefund.org/news)

We are excited about the promises of 2017. We expect to recruit our first executive director in early 2017, taking the fund’s work to the next level of impact (http://bit.ly/2hNHcSM). We are also excited about the above-mentioned framework of recommendations we are developing together with the Jed Foundation. This “Equal Chance at Mental Health Framework” will be highly actionable, with ten concise expert recommendations at its core that colleges and universities can implement to improve the support for the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color on their campuses. We are convening a special higher education summit on February 13 in New York, to obtain input and advice on the draft framework from leaders at U.S. colleges and universities. We are targeting the beginning of April to roll out the finalized framework with an extensive media campaign. We expect a high level of interest by the media and by our targeted audiences, especially by leaders of colleges and universities. Most importantly, we expect for this framework to have a real impact on what colleges and universities do to better support the mental health and emotional well-being of their students of color.

Once more, thank you for your interest and for your support. Please visit stevefund.org/updates to subscribe to the Steve Fund’s newsletter (it comes to your inbox once every three months). And, of course, there is always stevefund.org/donate

Last but not least, I’d like to once more say “741741”. This is the above-mentioned number to which students of color can text the keyword STEVE to connect with a crisis counselor. If we learn this number by heart, it gives all of us an easy and concrete way to offer assistance to a young person of color who might need help, simply by suggesting she or he text “STEVE” to 741741.

With warmest wishes for you and your loved ones,

Your friends at the Steve Fund





Article: Mary Christie Foundation features Steve Fund’s work

Posted: December 16, 2016 6:33 pm
 

The Mary Christie Foundation is running an in-depth feature on the Steve Fund’s work in the 4th Quarter 2016 edition of Mary Christie Quarterly.  The article describes the young organization’s journey from its beginning to becoming America’s only non-profit focused on the well-being of students of color.

Read the article

The Mary Christie Foundation is a thought leadership and philanthropic organization dedicated to the health and wellness of teens and young adults.





Coming early 2017: The Equal Chance at Mental Health Framework

Posted: December 6, 2016 4:38 pm
 

Coming in early 2017: The Equal Chance at Mental Health Framework

The Steve Fund and The Jed Foundation have partnered to create the Equal Chance at Mental Health  Framework with evidence-based expert recommendations for America’s colleges and universities to better support the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color. Too many students of color are failing academically, suffering emotionally and in some cases are facing serious risk, including death, because population-specific factors influencing their mental health are poorly understood. The Equal Chance at Mental Health  Framework will be based on a systematic literature review, on a survey of existing evidence-based programs, on expert input from mental health and higher education leaders  and on a survey of more than 1,000 students.

TheEqual Chance at Mental Health  Framework will be released early 2017. To sign up for updates, please fill out the form below. Thank you for your interest.

jed-foundation-logo





Webinar: Home for the holidays – Supporting your student

Posted: November 14, 2016 8:41 pm
 

Webinar Part 3: Home for the holidays – Supporting your student through transitions

New Webinar Series on Student-Of-Color Mental Health

The Steve Fund will host a three-installment webinar series for parents and families addressing the mental health of college students of color.

The webinar series will focus on aspects of mental health and well-being for the student, discussing topics ranging from the unique pressures and challenges faced by students of color, to potential strategies for positive change. The presenter is Dr. Meeta Kumar, Director of Outreach and Prevention Services at the Counseling and Psychological Services as well as adjunct faculty at the University of Pennsylvania. She will discuss challenges faced by students of color during college and emerging adulthood and ways in which parents and family members can help their child thrive within this environment. We hope that this conversation will prompt dialogue and build knowledge around this issue among families, college leaders and service providers, and promote innovative solutions for this population.

The webinars will be of interest to parents and family members, college and university leaders, faculty, researchers, student services staff, college counseling professionals, and students and peers. They are ideal for families who seek to support the success and emotional well-being of students of color. They are also valuable to all mental health and student services professionals who would like to learn more on the subject from outstanding thought leaders in this area. Please join us as we discuss challenges faced by this group of students, opportunities for families to serve as impactful advocates and supporters of their students’ mental health, and institutional approaches for supporting program improvement.

Following the live webinars, access to view the recorded content will be available at the Steve Fund’s Knowledge Center on www.stevefund.org.

3rd Webinar: Thursday, December 1, 2016 12:30 PM – 1:30 PM EDT 

Home for the holidays: Supporting your student through transitions

Your college student will be home soon. Though holidays are eagerly awaited, they can often be stressful for both college students and their families. Learn about some common challenges that families face during the holidays and develop strategies for a positive experience. Holidays also offer opportunities to take stock of how your student is doing and how the semester worked out for them. This is also a time to support them in addressing academic, social or personal concerns. The webinar will provide information about university policies like leaves of absence and accommodations so families can work with their students to help them make good life decisions.

RSVP NOW

Presenter: Dr. Meeta Kumar, Director of Outreach and Prevention Services at the Counseling and Psychological Services as well as adjunct faculty at the University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Meeta Kumar

Dr. Meeta Kumar

Dr. Meeta Kumar is a psychologist and an experienced professional in the field of college mental health. She currently serves as the Director of Outreach and Prevention Services at the Counseling and Psychological Services as well as adjunct faculty at the University of Pennsylvania. She is responsible for coordination, development and delivery of university wide programs that support mental health and wellness of students. She works closely with all campus constituencies including faculty/staff, student groups and parents/families. She is a national presenter on an array of college mental health topics. She is adjunct faculty in the Asian American Studies department. She received her Ph.D. from the Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania.





Steve Fund welcomes two new Youth Advisory Board members

Posted: October 24, 2016 10:09 pm
 
Jonea Ahouissoussi and Seher Raza

Jonea Ahouissoussi and Seher Raza

The Steve Fund warmly welcomes two new members of its Youth Advisory Board, Seher Raza (University of Virginia, 2017) and Jonea Ahouissoussi (University of Virginia, 2017).

Seher Raza is a senior at the University of Virginia, majoring in Psychology. She is currently in the Distinguished Majors Program, developing her own research study in the Social Psychology Wilson Lab to learn more about mental thought processes. Seher became passionate about mental health at a very young age after coming face-to-face with a variety of mental health illnesses that run in her family.

Ultimately, Seher hopes to work in a counseling-related career to continue providing support to individuals in the domain of mental health.  She is passionate about how mental health relates to people of color and defeating negative stereotypes that are associated with mental health such as the ones she has witnessed in her own South Asian, Pakistani, household. Using her personal experiences as a drive, Seher is excited to provide a lasting impact through working with the Youth Advisory Fund.

Jonea Ahouissoussi is a senior at the University of Virginia, majoring in Women Gender and Sexuality and minoring in Sociology. She has grown up in Benin, located in West Africa and is deeply interested in how mental health issues relate to the African communities. She has seen how issues surrounding mental health are often a taboo topic in African communities. She hopes to learn more about how mental health issues relate to people of color and especially within the African community.

This year Jonea became the Co-Student Director of Project Rise, an initiative focused on helping African-American students with social, personal, and academic issues, ultimately aiming to improve mental health. Jonea is also the founder of Success at SEA, an intervention created under Project Rise, focused on providing students with social, emotional, and academic support during their transition from college to post-graduation.

More about the Youth Advisory Board




Steve Fund Team Chosen by Tumblr in Quilt Project to Support Student of Color Mental Health

Posted: October 17, 2016 7:17 pm
 

Steve Fund works with Tumblr in Mental Health Quilt Project

Tumblr has chosen the Steve Fund as one of three charitable partner organizations for its Mental Health Quilt project. The quilt is a collaboration between Tumblr and the City of New York. Each patch of this quilt is a creative expression of someone’s relationship with mental illness–their own, or someone they love. Tumblr is building this quilt, both digitally and physically, to reduce the stigma surrounding mental and emotional health and to show the community that they are not alone in what they are experiencing.

Stephen "Steve" C. Rose

The Steve Fund is named to honor the legacy of Stephen C. Rose.

Tumblr users can create and submit original artistic swatches and panels to PostItForward.tumblr.com/QuiltSubmissions to be included in a quilt installation that will be on display in New York City and online at PostItForward.tumblr.com/MentalHealthQuilt.

Tumbr provides templates and detailed instructions to make the submission process easy.

Each patch represents a creative expression around changing the conversation around mental health and an individual’s relationship with mental illness, whether battling it themselves or helping others with their struggles.

For every patch a user submits, Tumblr will donate $1 to one of three different charities who support mental health, up to a total aggregate donation of $20,000. The user submitting the patch will be given an option of choosing which charity – National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), The Trevor Project or The Steve Fund – their original panel will benefit.

The Steve Fund is thrilled to be Tumblr’s partner in this project.

If you participate in Tumblr’s Mental Health Quilt project, please choose the Steve Fund as your charity. Thank you!

What you can do:

About the Steve Fund

The Steve Fund is the nation’s only non-profit organization focused on promoting the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color. It works with colleges and universities, students, non-profits, researchers, practitioners, and with groups serving diverse populations. It aims to stimulate dialogue and to promote effective programs and strategies that build understanding and assistance regarding the mental health and emotional well-being of the nation’s students of color as they enter, matriculate in, and transition from higher education.

News release by Tumblr





Steve Fund Senior Medical Advisor Dr. Annelle Primm Receives Award

Posted: October 17, 2016 2:33 pm
 
Steve Fund Senior Medical Advisor Dr. Annelle Primm

Steve Fund Senior Medical Advisor Dr. Annelle Primm

Steve Fund Senior Medical Advisor Annelle Primm, M.D., MPH, has received the prestigious Alexandra Symonds Award For Outstanding Women Psychiatrists. The Award is given out by the American Psychiatric Association. It was established in 1997 in memory of Alexandra Symonds, MD, an APA Fellow and co-founder of the Association of Women Psychiatrists. The award recognizes and honors a woman psychiatrist who has made significant contributions to promoting women’s health and the advancement of women.

At the recent awards ceremony, the current President of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), Dr. Maria Oquendo, presented Dr. Primm with the award. During the same program, New York’s First Lady, Chirlane McCray, was also given an award for her mental health advocacy.

In her award lecture titled “Toward an Equal Chance for Mental Health in a Diverse College World”, Dr. Primm highlighted the work of the Steve Fund. A short abstract of Dr. Primm’s award lecture is included below.

Annelle B. Primm, M. D., MPH, is currently serving as Senior Medical Adviser to the Steve Fund, Senior Psychiatrist Adviser to Urban Behavioral Associates, and several other organizations. During her career, Dr. Primm has been a physician executive at the American Psychiatric Association; a medical educator, administrator and clinician at Johns Hopkins Hospital Community Psychiatry Program; an editor of the books, Disparities in Psychiatric Care and Women in Psychiatry: Personal Perspectives; and a lecturer and video producer on the mental health of diverse and underserved populations. Well known for her leadership of community collaborations, Dr. Primm is the Convener and Chair of the All Healers Mental Health Alliance, a national network of mental health professionals, health advocates and faith community leaders that facilitates culturally tailored responses to the mental health needs of people affected by disasters.

Short Abstract of Award Lecture

Annelle B. Primm, M.D., MPH
Alexandra Symonds Award Lecture
IPS 2016
Toward an Equal Chance at Mental Health in a Diverse College World

This presentation will highlight the work of the Steve Fund, a new non-profit with a focus on the mental health and well-being of college students of color. The lecturer serves as a senior medical adviser for this organization.

The need for the Steve Fund is clear. The time between adolescence and early adulthood is a period of development fraught with stressful challenges. This period is also one in which common mental illnesses such as depression and anxiety have their initial onset. The experiences of college students of color in this age range who attend schools in which they are in the minority are compounded by additional risks associated with negative stereotypes, isolation, alienation, marginalization and an environment with values often at odds with their cultures of origin. These conditions set the stage for and increase the likelihood of young people of color experiencing diminished mental health and well-being and sub-optimal academic performance. A recent national survey has documented that students of color are more likely than their white counterparts to experience stress and feelings of being overwhelmed in college.

Challenges facing university students of color are occurring in a societal context of heightened racial tension and student activism. Universities around the country have experienced student protests calling for greater attention to diversity on campus and the allocation of resources and implementation of services that support the mental health of young people who are marginalized in the university environment due to their racial, ethnic or cultural identity. Intersectionality involving racial and ethnic identity along with gender, religion, sexual orientation and other characteristics add to the complexity of biases affecting students in the college environment. This presentation will take a closer look at the experiences of women students of color.

Through its conferences, resources and partnerships, the Steve Fund has begun to elucidate the unique risks and challenges of college students of color and offer information on protective factors, services and resources that can be implemented to buffer, mitigate or eliminate risks to well-being and academic success that will, in turn, create for students of color an equal chance at mental health.