Monthly Archives

September 2019

The Steve Fund Announces Susan L. Taylor as Symposium Keynote Speaker

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The Steve Fund is pleased to announce Susan L. Taylor as the official keynote speaker at its symposium dedicated to THE ROLE OF RELIGION AND SPIRITUALITY IN MENTAL HEALTH: Challenges and Opportunities Supporting Youth of Color on November 5, held at the historic True Reformer Building in Washington, DC.

 

ABOUT KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Susan L. Taylor, best-selling author of four books, and editor of eight others, is a fourth-generation entrepreneur, who grew up in Harlem working in her father’s clothing store. At 24, she founded her own cosmetics company, which led to the beauty editor’s position at Essence, the publication she would go on to shape into a world-renown brand with more than 8 million readers. It was that enterprising spirit wedded to a deep love for her community that led to the founding of the National CARES Mentoring Movement in 2005 as Essence CARES. With local affiliates in 58 cities, National CARES has recruited, trained and deployed more than 150,000 mentors to schools and youth-support and mentoring organizations like Big Brothers, Big Sisters, as well as to its own culturally rooted, academic- and social-transformational initiatives. A community-mobilization movement, National CARES is the only organization dedicated to providing mentoring, healing and wellness services on a national scale for Black children.

Ms. Taylor is a recipient of more than a dozen honorary doctorates and hundreds of awards, including the Phoenix Award, which is the highest honor given by Congressional Black Caucus. A lifelong activist who has worked to ensure people across the globe, from South Africa to those who struggled in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, Susan Taylor says that securing our vulnerable children is her highest calling and the big business of our nation and Black America today.

ABOUT THE EVENT

This Steve Fund symposium brings together mental health professionals, religious and spiritual leaders, academics, and youth leaders to explore how religion, spirituality and mental health intersect and how this impacts the support of young people of color in different cultural groups and with different identities.  This topic is one of great relevance and resonance but with scant documentation.

As an organization focused on supporting the mental health and emotional well- being of young people of color, we are committed to building and sharing knowledge.  This is one of a series of convenings that will examine critically important topics in order to surface opportunities for collaboration, provide learning and inform the work of The Steve Fund going forward.

We are delighted to be meeting in the historic True Reformer Building, in the heart of the famous U St. Corridor in Washington, DC.  This civic and cultural landmark was designed for community conversations, conferences, and reform- mission aligned with our symposium.

Space is limited. Registration is now open.

ABOUT THE STEVE FUND

The Steve Fund is the nation’s only organization focused on supporting the mental health and emotional well-being of young people of color.  The Steve Fund works with colleges and universities, non-profits, researchers, mental health experts, families and young people to promote programs and strategies that build understanding and assistance for the mental and emotional health of the nation’s young people of color.

The Steve Fund Hosts Important Symposium on Supporting Young People of Color: The Role of Religion and Spirituality in Mental Health

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

Mario Starks
mario@stevefund.org

THE STEVE FUND HOSTS IMPORTANT SYMPOSIUM ON SUPPORTING YOUNG PEOPLE OF COLOR: THE ROLE OF RELIGION AND SPIRITUALITY IN MENTAL HEALTH

Washington, DC. – September 19, 2019 – Although religious belief is a cornerstone for roughly 85% of the world’s population, it has never been the most popular subject of study among psychologists.  

Historically psychology, religion, and spirituality have often been pitted against each other as mechanisms to address issues of the mind, body, and soul.  Sigmund Freud once called religion the “universal obsessional neurosis of humanity.” This view can have sub-optimal consequences, especially for African American, LatinX, and Native Americans who have higher levels of religious and spiritual engagement compared to whites, including among college-age youth.  

THE STEVE FUND will hold a symposium dedicated to The Role of Religion and Spirituality in Mental Health: Challenges and Opportunities Supporting Youth of Color on November 5, 2019, 8am-5pm at the historic True Reformer Building (1200 U Street, NW, Washington, DC).

Updated (09/25/19): The Steve Fund is pleased to announce Susan L. Taylor as the official keynote speaker

This symposium will provide a forum to explore how religion, spirituality and mental health intersect and how this impacts the support of young people of color in different cultural groups and with different identities.  This is a subject of great relevance and resonance, but with scant documentation. A diverse group of mental health professionals, religious and spiritual leaders, academics, and youth leaders will come together to discuss pertinent issues, surface opportunities for collaboration and innovation, and share best practices that will positively contribute to the health and well being of young people of color.  This is one of a series of convenings that will examine critically important topics in order to provide learning and inform the work of The Steve Fund going forward.

Early Registration Now Open

For more information  and to register for this seminal event, visit the registration page at stevefund.org/dc-symposium.

About The Steve Fund

The Steve Fund is the nation’s only organization focused on supporting the mental health and emotional well-being of young people of color.  The Steve Fund works with colleges and universities, non-profits, researchers, mental health experts, families and young people to promote programs and strategies that build understanding and assistance for the mental and emotional health of the nation’s young people of color.

www.stevefund.org

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Watch Video Replay—Transitioning to College (Live Streamed, 9.18)

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9/18: Live Streamed Event: Transitioning to College

Mental Health and Wellness for Students of Color: Transitioning to College 
Presented in partnership with The Steve Fund and jointly with HuffPost
Noon-1pm ET » Watch Video Replay Below

Amid the bustle on U.S. college campuses, a growing incidence of mental health issues is causing concern. College students of color are reporting depression and anxiety coupled with, among some groups, an increased risk for suicide. Many also report feeling more isolated and more overwhelmed than their white classmates, according to surveys conducted by Harris Poll, yet are less likely to seek counseling services on campus.

Watch video replay: 

 

Self-Care Blog: Raising Awareness about Suicide Prevention

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Every September we observe Suicide Prevention Month. It is a time to learn as much as we can about this alarming public health issue—most often related to mental illness. And it is also a time to listen, to offer help, and to eliminate stigmas around suicidal thoughts and seeking support.

Recent statistics suggest that suicide is on the rise among young people ages 15 to 24 years old, as are incidents of suicidal thoughts. Suicide rates are much higher for some population segments such as American Indians/Alaska Natives and rising for others such as young black males.  Despite the mental stress from dealing with persistent racism, discrimination and exclusion, young people of color are half as likely than the general population to get the mental health care they need. Mental health services, social support, and connectedness are just a few of the approaches that can help prevent suicide.

At The Steve Fund, we want to provide all young people of color with support resources that help meet these specific needs. That’s why we have partnered with some of the most innovative tech solutions, including:

  • Anytime, anywhere, text STEVE to 741741 and a live, trained Crisis Counselor will respond. Whether you’re feeling down, stressed or overwhelmed, this service is specifically designed to help meet the unique needs of young people of color.
  • There’s always someone to talk to via our partnership with the 7Cups platform. Young people of color can find support, therapy or simply someone to speak to.

We also want to share a few reminders to help you deal with challenges and thoughts that may weigh heavily on you.

  • There is no shame in seeking help for mental health concerns. We often hear messages to stay “strong,” but it is important to be honest with ourselves when we or people we care about are thinking in a self-destructive way.  Taking care of ourselves by getting help from a health professional is a priority.
  • If it feels important, then it is important. Whether you are listening to someone around you or dealing with your own thoughts, recognize that suicidal thoughts are serious and deserve your attention.
  • Listen openly, without judgment. One of the most important ways we can help prevent suicide is by listening, accepting what we hear and showing that we care by helping people get the help they need.

On behalf of everyone at The Steve Fund, I invite you to commemorate Suicide Prevention Month with us by taking the time to listen. You never know when someone may need your help.

Be well,


Anuja Khemka
Executive Director