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Conference Program - Young, Gifted, & @Risk - Stanford 2015
Conference Program - Young, Gifted, & @Risk - Stanford 2015
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Symposium Schedule: Young, Gifted, & @Risk 

Friday Nov 20th, 2015

Location: Stanford University, Graduate School of Education

7:30-8:15 a.m. Registration & Continental Breakfast

Old Union Clubhouse Ballroom (2nd floor, Room 100)

520 Lasuen Mall

Stanford, CA 94305

8:15-9:00 a.m. Welcome & Overview of Symposium

Old Union Clubhouse Ballroom (2nd floor, Room 100)
520 Lasuen Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Evan Rose, President, The Steve Fund

Laura Roberts, M.D., M.A., McCormick Memorial Professor and Chair of Psychiatry, Stanford University

Linda Darling-Hammond, Ed.D., Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education, Emerita; Faculty Director, Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education; Stanford University: Symposium Moderator

Shashank V. Joshi, M.D., Associate Professor and Director of Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry; Director of the School Mental Health Team of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital; Stanford University: Symposium Co-Moderator

9:00-10:30 a.m. Panel 1 – Marginality, Belonging, and Success: The University Experience and the Mental Health of Students and Emerging Adults of Color

Old Union Clubhouse Ballroom (2nd floor, Room 100)
520 Lasuen Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

SPEAKERS: Daphne Watkins, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Social Work (University of Michigan); Teresa LaFromboise, Ph.D., Professor of Education (Stanford University); and Dr. Byron D. Clift Breland, Ph.D., President of San Jose City College

Panel Description

The university environment, quality of the university experience, and the “feel” of the campus community can have sizable effects on the mental well-being of young people of color. Speakers in this panel will address the forces at play within the university environment, the scope and scale of the challenges they present, and their impact on the adjustment and overall success of aspiring young people of color during their college years and early adulthood. Experts will compare the distinctive mental health challenges of the college years and environment to those of other life stages and settings. Experiences of marginality and belonging and how they contribute to overall well-being of students of color will also be examined.

10:30-10:45 a.m. BREAK

10:45-12:15 p.m. Panel 2 – How Culture, Mindset, and Identity Shape and Affect Mental Health Among Young Adults

Old Union Clubhouse Ballroom (2nd floor, Room 100)
520 Lasuen Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

SPEAKERS: Jeanne Tsai, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology (Stanford University); Alia Crum, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology (Stanford University); and Virgil Moorehead, Psy.D., Postdoctoral Fellow, Counseling and Psychological Services (Stanford University)

Panel Description

Speakers will present their cutting-edge research in affective science and social psychology that demonstrates the ways in which our cultures, subjective mindsets, and identities shape young people’s emotions, feeling states, and experiences of mental health and well- being. Cultural differences in how we ideally want to feel, as well as what we want to avoid feeling, can powerfully shape young people’s emotional experiences and responses as well as psychological health. Likewise, changes in our subjective mindsets, or the lenses through which we perceive and interpret our experiences, can shape how young people experience and respond to emotional states—for example, viewing stress as something that either enhances or debilitates your performance, i.e., your “stress mindset,” can influence one’s behavioral responses to and physiological experiences of stress. Implications for supporting the psychological and emotional health of young adults and young adults of color in elite college environments will be discussed.

12:15-2:15 p.m. LUNCH & CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Break & pick up box lunch

12:15-12:45 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions 12:45-2:15 p.m.

  1. Lunch Concurrent Session 1 – Thriving in a Multicultural College World

520 Galvez Mall, CERAS Room 101
Stanford, CA 94305

SPEAKERS: Hazel Rose Markus, Ph.D., Davis-Brack Professor in the Behavioral Sciences, Department of Psychology (Stanford University); Annelle Primm, M.D., M.P.H. (Johns Hopkins University); and Vanessa Volpe, doctoral candidate in Psychology (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Stephen C. Rose Foundation Scholar); moderated by MarYam Hamedani, Ph.D., Associate Director of the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (Stanford University)

Session Description

Speakers will address how supporting students’ psychological, emotional, and mental health needs requires not only mental health literacy, but also multicultural literacy. The mainstream culture of U.S. higher education, especially among elite college campuses, contains many seemingly neutral assumptions about what it means to be a “good,” “normal,” “educated,” or “successful” person that reflect White, middle-to-upper class norms, values, and ways of being. Racial and ethnic minority students, as well as students from low-income or working class backgrounds, can face numerous threats to their sense of fit and belonging, experience overt or implicit bias and discrimination, and may not be able to leverage the cultural “know-how” needed to succeed in these spaces. Panelists will address what students from diverse backgrounds need to thrive in college environments and how colleges and universities can change their norms, values, and practices to be more equitable and inclusive as well as foster academic achievement for all students.

  1. Lunch Concurrent Session 2 – Acculturative Family Distancing and Other Challenges Faced by Young Adults from Immigrant Families

520 Galvez Mall, CERAS Room 204
Stanford, CA 94305

SPEAKERS: Wei-Chin Hwang, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology (Claremont College) and Alejandro Martinez, Ph.D., Associate Dean of Students, Dean of Students Office (Stanford University); moderated by Shashank V. Joshi, M.D., Associate Professor and Director of Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry; Director of the School Mental Health Team of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital (Stanford University)

Session Description

Acculturative Family Distancing (AFD) is defined as the distancing that occurs between parents and teens/ young adults as a result of communication difficulties and differences in cultural values as children transition through adolescence and into early adulthood. This phenomenon may be most pronounced in immigrant students. Researchers believe that AFD may directly affect depression by decreasing family cohesion, and that parent–child differences may become more pronounced if not addressed through culturally effective treatment approaches in the young adult years.

Speakers in this session will discuss the ways in which high levels of AFD (e.g., major parent–child differences in cultural values and language use) are directly related to symptomatic young adult depression through decreased levels of family cohesion. With a greater understanding of how AFD works in mental health, therapies that serve to understand and alleviate parent-child differences in cultural values and language use can strengthen family cohesion, address a cause of young adult depression and potentially prevent serious consequences, including suicide attempts. More effective approaches for our youth and their families will be discussed.

Lunch Concurrent Session 3 – Mental Health at Stanford: Current Conversations and Meeting the Needs of Diverse Students

Old Union Clubhouse Ballroom
520 Lasuen Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

SPEAKERS: Rona Hu, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Stanford University); Cindy Ng, Associate Dean and Director, Asian American Activities Center (Stanford University); and Abhilasha Belani, Project Specialist, Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and recent Stanford graduate (Stanford University); moderated by Yasmin Owusu, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Stanford University)

Session Description

Speakers will discuss current conversations taking place at Stanford around better supporting student mental and emotional health and well- being. From dealing with stress and high expectations, to meeting the needs of students from diverse racial, ethic, sexuality, gender, social class, and religious backgrounds, to adequately supporting students who experience marginalization, assault, or chronic mental health conditions, students at Stanford have spoken out in recent years—especially during the 2014-15 academic year—about their needs and strong desire for the university to do more. Panelists will discuss student experiences and concerns, what works well and what can be improved among existing services, and new initiatives and pilot programs that are being developed to improve services and address student needs.

2:15-2:30 p.m. BREAK

2:30-4:30 p.m. Panel 3 – Promising Strategies for Mental Health on Campus and Beyond for Young People of Color

Old Union Clubhouse Ballroom (2nd floor, Room 100)
520 Lasuen Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

SPEAKERS: Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton, Ph.D., Richard and Rhoda Goldman Professor, Department of Psychology (University of California-Berkeley); Jeanne Manese, Ph.D., Director of the Counseling Center (University of California-Irvine, Counseling Center Goals in Action (GIA); Jan Collins-Eaglin, Ph.D., Associate Dean of Students for Personal Success and Wellness (Pomona College); and Carole Pertofsky, Ph.D., Director of Wellness/Health Promotion Services, Vaden Health Center (Stanford University)

Panel Description

Speakers will address the unique obstacles to mental health literacy and help-seeking among young people of color on campus, and the need for engagement by college leaders, peers, families, communities, and other key stakeholders in promoting their health and well-being. This panel will also discuss key elements of current approaches and practices aimed at helping young people of color overcome mental health challenges in university settings and beyond, sharing key learnings and implications for next steps. The panel will highlight innovative mental health programming, and offer suggestions for addressing the mental health crisis moving forward. The impact of tensions and events in the broader society upon the emotional well- being of college students of color will also be examined.

4:30 – 5:15 pm Discussion and Closing Remarks

Old Union Clubhouse Ballroom (2nd floor, Room 100)
520 Lasuen Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Evan Rose, President, The Steve Fund

Shashank V. Joshi, M.D., Associate Professor and Director of Training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry; Director of the School Mental Health Team of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital; Stanford University: Symposium Co-Moderator

MarYam Hamedani, Ph.D., Associate Director of the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, Stanford University: Symposium Co-Sponsor

TBD: Current & former students to discuss reflections

5:15 pm ADJOURN