Speakers and Presenters – Young, Gifted & @Risk 2018, University of Texas at Austin

Ricardo Ainslie

Ricardo Ainslie

Ricardo Ainslie Ricardo Ainslie, Ph.D., is M. K. Hage Centennial Professor in Education, Department of Educational Psychology and holder of the M. K. Hage Centennial Professorship in Education. Ricardo Ainslie explores the intersection of psychology and culture through such topics as the psychological experience of immigration, ethnic conflicts within communities, and the relationship between individual and collective identity. He pursues these topics primarily through the descriptive methodology of qualitative inquiry. Additionally, Ainslie examines these matters through books, documentary films, and photographic exhibits. Drawing from the fields of anthropology, creative non-fiction, and the liberal arts, Ainslie has generated a hybrid methodology of ‘psychoanalytic ethnography’ based on in-depth interviews of profoundly psychological character. His extensive work in Texas and Mexico propelled his inquiry into how communities function and transform in response to significant conflict. Ainslie is particularly interested in investigating how individuals and broader cultural groups experience life within these affected communities. Ainslie’s multidisciplinary and integrative sensibility is evident in his extensive involvement throughout the University of Texas at Austin, where he is professionally affiliated with the American Studies Program, the Center for Mexican American Studies, and the Lozano-Long Institute for Latin American Studies. He is the M. K. Hage Centennial Professor in Education, was recently a Fellow in the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, and taught at Houston’s Center for Psychoanalytic Studies for seven years.

Mike Andorka

Mike Andorka

Mike Andorka, Ph.D., L.P, is a Diversity, Counseling, and Outreach Specialist at UT Austin Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC). From a clinical perspective, Mike stems from an eclectic theoretical orientation. His interventions include techniques from feminist, interpersonal, cognitive-behavioral, multicultural, and critical pedagogy rooted in a strong therapeutic alliance. He specifically enjoys working with LGBTQIA students and students of color. He also has clinical experience working with survivors of interpersonal trauma, alcohol and drug moderation/recovery, eating/body image concerns.

Germine Awad

Germine Awad

Germine Awad, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, College of Education, and recipient of the Louise Spence Griffeth Fellowship for Excellence at UT Austin. Dr. Awad’s scholarship is characterized by three interrelated areas of inquiry: prejudice and discrimination, identity and acculturation, and more recently, body image among women of color. She has also written in the area of multicultural research methodology. The majority of her research is guided by the questions “What factors lead to discrimination against ethnic minorities?” and “What impacts perceptions of experienced discrimination?” The two populations that she has primarily focused on are Arab/Middle Eastern Americans and African Americans. Although overt discrimination towards ethnic minorities has decreased over the years, the practice of more covert, subtle forms of prejudice remains. The events of September 11, 2001, however, reintroduced more explicit forms of prejudice towards Arab/Middle Eastern Americans, and those perceived to be Muslim, complicating the dialogue on discrimination in the United States. Awad is concerned with how prejudicial attitudes and ideology impact attitudes towards ethnic minorities generally and within specific domains such as the workplace and higher education. In addition, she examines how racial/ethnic identity and acculturation impact ethnic minorities’ perception of discrimination. Most recently, she has expanded her identity and acculturation research to the study of body image concerns among women of color.

Brigitte Bailey

Brigitte Bailey

Brigitte Bailey, M.D. is Training Director of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency Program and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Dr. Bailey received her medical degree from the University of New Mexico. She completed her residency in General Psychiatry and a fellowship in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at UTHSCSA. She is board certified in both General and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Dr. Bailey is involved in clinical, teaching, and research activities. As Training Director, she is involved in coordinating Quality Improvement Projects of residents, developing curriculum, resident and faculty development, and maintaining accreditation with the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education.  Dr. Bailey has served in leadership roles on several local, state, and national committees involving psychiatry and children. She is involved with a regional networking and mentoring group that is based at the Baylor College of Medicine. She has been involved with the American Psychiatric Association as a Transformational Leader. Her role included providing consultation to the Virgin Islands mental health authority. Dr. Bailey has served as an examiner for the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. She has been a coordinator in directing and organizing the site for the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Board Examinations in San Antonio, TX.  Dr. Bailey is a Mentor for medical students in their first through fourth year of studies. She also mentors residents and medical students in other states. She provides psychotherapy and career supervision to residents. Dr. Bailey is involved in teaching the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and General Psychiatry residents. Her topics include Ethics, Cultural Psychiatry, Gender Issues, Depression, and various therapy modalities. Previously as Co-Director, now Director of Psychiatric Services, Dr. Bailey provides consultation to the Medical Director of the Texas Juvenile Justice Department (TJJD).  She has been involved in quality-improvement of the psychiatric care of incarcerated youth. This entails providing independent chart reviews, review of grievances, and participation in developing diagnostic management guidelines and psychiatric medication formularies. She also serves on TJJD committees of Mental Health, Pharmacy and Therapeutics, and Quality Improvement.  Dr. Bailey consults with the San Antonio Independent School District (SAISD). Consultations have included psychiatric clinics at elementary schools and developing educational presentations for staff, parents, and the community. Educational topics have been presented on community violence, trauma, the impact of poverty on mental health, and psychiatric illnesses and treatment. The partnership with SAISD has expanded to include the Eastside Promise Network. Her clinical sites include Clarity Child Guidance Center, UTHSCSA, KCI Children`s Shelter Residential Treatment Center (medical director), and Harvey J. Najim Hope Center (medical director). The Children’s Shelter is a long-term placement for abused children primarily in foster care. The Hope Center provides outpatient services specifically for children with a history of abuse. The majority of her clinics are involved in the education of medical students and residents. Dr. Bailey’s clinical practice primarily focuses on the assessment and treatment of childhood disorders. She uses a family systems approach which involves the family, community, and the school system. Her expertise is in psychosocial issues and their influence on psychiatric illnesses. She would like to expand her research experience into community psychiatry. Dr. Bailey`s research interests now include domestic sex-trafficking of minors.

Valerie Bell

Valerie Bell

Valerie D. Bell, J.D.,  is an attorney and civic volunteer specializing in not-for-profit administration and management. She is actively involved in local, regional and national efforts to ensure equity in educational opportunity, improve race relations, and foster economic parity. She has chosen to devote all of her professional time, on a pro bono basis, to these and other public policy issues. Valerie is a member of the Board of The Steve Fund, Chair of the Board (and former Interim CEO) of the St. Louis Public Schools Foundation. She also serves on the boards of the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership, The St. Louis Black Leadership Roundtable, the National Conference of Community and Justice (NCCJ-STL) and the Equal Housing Opportunity Council. In addition, she is a Commissioner of the Missouri History Museum Sub-district, a member of the National Council of the Gephardt Institute for Public Service (Washington University), a member of the Board of Visitors for the Independence Center, and an elected member of the International Women’s Forum (Missouri). Valerie has served the St. Louis Community in a variety of capacities, including serving as legal counsel to the Settlement Coordinator for the historic St. Louis school segregation case. She is Past Board Chair of John Burroughs School and FOCUS St. Louis, and past Secretary of the Board for Parents as Teachers (international). She has also been a trustee at the Independent Schools Association of the Central States (ISACS), Fontbonne University, the St. Louis Science Center, the Deaconess Foundation, the YWCA of Metropolitan St. Louis, Grace Hill Settlement House, the Aquinas Institute of Theology, and the St. Louis Community College Foundation, among others.

Alfiee Breland-Noble

Alfiee Breland-Noble

Alfiee M. Breland-Noble, Ph.D., is Director of the AAKOMA (African American Knowledge Optimized for Mindfully-Healthy Adolescents) Project and Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the Georgetown University Medical Center. She serves as Senior Scientific Adviser to The Steve Fund. Dr. Breland-Noble, psychologist and researcher, focuses on reducing mental health disparities in racially diverse youth and families. Her clinical expertise includes culturally relevant treatment for depression and anxiety in teens and adults. She has spent most of her career in academic medicine and is a recognized expert in adolescent depression disparities. Dr. Breland-Noble is currently funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) and the National Institutes of Health. She leads multiple research teams with a focus on patient-centered outcomes research, community-based participatory research, behavioral clinical trials, and faith-based mental health promotion. She has been appointed to the American Psychological Association Board to Develop Depression Treatment Guidelines and the PCORI National Advisory Panel on Addressing Disparities. Dr. Breland-Noble completed her training at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (PhD), New York University (MA), Howard University (BA), and Duke University School of Medicine (MHSc).

Ciaura Brown is a 1st year medical student at University of Texas at Austin’s Dell Medical School. She was born and raised in Houston, TX, where she received a degree in Biology from Houston Baptist University. Moving to Austin to pursue medical education,  she has been inspired to address difficulties students of color may face in academic settings after experiencing her own setbacks. She is involved in initiatives that address patient advocacy, pipeline strengthening, and providing healthcare equity.

Kimberly Burdine

Kimberly Burdine

Kimberly Burdine, Ph.D. – Assistant Director, Director of Community Engagement and Psychologist at UT Dallas. Dr. Burdine earned her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Oklahoma State University, her M.S. in Counseling (School Counseling) from Oklahoma State University and her B.S. in Mathematics Education, Langston University. Her experience includes: Diversity Coordinator & Psychologist, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX; Staff Psychologist, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX; Doctoral Psychology Intern, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA; Practicum Counselor & Graduate Assistant, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK; Practicum Counselor, Wings of Hope (formerly Stillwater Domestic Violence Services), Stillwater, OK; School Counselor, Putnam City Public Schools, Oklahoma City, OK; Counseling Intern, Payne County Youth Services, Stillwater, OK. Dr. Burdine’s interests include Mental Health Promotion, Awareness & Stigma Reduction; Diversity, Equity & Inclusion in Mental Health; Interpersonal Violence Awareness & Harm Reduction; Family of Origin, Young Adult Development & Identity Concerns; First Generation College Student Experience | Relationship Concerns; Spirituality, Spiritual Identity Concerns & Religious Trauma Recovery; Cultural Identity Development (i.e. Race, Ethnicity, Age, Ability, Gender Identity, Size, Religion, Sexual Orientation, Nationality, Gender Expression, Spirituality, Socioeconomic Status), Cultural Identity Based Stress and Trauma; Group Counseling Services; Mentoring & Training Future & Early Career Mental Health Professionals.

Kevin Cokley

Kevin Cokley

Kevin Cokley, Ph.D., is Oscar and Anne Mauzy Regents Professor for Educational Research and Development, Department of Educational Psychology; Director of the Institute for Urban Policy Research and Analysis, Institute for Urban Policy Research and Analysis, College of Liberal Arts; Professor, African and African Diaspora Studies Department, College of Liberal Arts; Oscar and Anne Mauzy Regents Professorship for Educational Research and Development at UT Austin, and The University of Texas System Academy of Distinguished Teachers Fellow   Dr. Cokley’s research can be broadly categorized in the area of African American psychology, with a focus on racial and ethnic identity development, academic motivation and academic achievement. A theme of much of his research is understanding the psychological and environmental factors that impact African American student achievement. Cokley’s research and scholarship have led him to challenge the notion that African American students are anti-intellectual, and to critically re-examine the impact of racial and ethnic identity and gender on academic achievement. Recently Cokley has started exploring the impostor phenomenon and its relationship to mental health and academic outcomes among ethnic minority students. Cokley’s publications have appeared in professional journals such as the Journal of Counseling Psychology, Journal of Black Psychology, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Individual Differences and Personality, Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, the Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, Educational and Psychological Measurement, and the Harvard Educational Review. Cokley has a joint appointment in the College of Education’s Department of Educational Psychology and the College of Liberal Arts’ Department of African and African Diaspora Studies. He is the Past Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Black Psychology and the Director of the Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis. He has written several Op-Eds in major media outlets including the St. Louis Post Dispatch, Dallas Morning News, San Antonio Express, The American Prospect, The Huffington Post, The Conversation and The Hill on topics such as Blacks’ rational mistrust of police, police shootings of Blacks, the aftermath of Ferguson, the use of school vouchers, racial disparities in school discipline, and Black students’ graduation rates.

Gregory Fenves

Gregory Fenves

Gregory L. Fenves, Ph.D., is the 29th president of The University of Texas at Austin. Before he became president in 2015, he served the university as executive vice president and provost and as dean of UT’s Cockrell School of Engineering. For his research and teaching, Fenves was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2014, the highest recognition for an engineer in the United States. He holds the Cockrell Family Chair in Engineering #15 and the Ed and Carolyn Hyman Presidential Leadership Chair at UT Austin. As president, Fenves has prioritized student success. By introducing and expanding mentoring programs and incentive-based scholarships targeted to help students who need it most, UT Austin’s graduation rates are now at record high levels. His administration has strengthened the impact of longstanding research efforts while investing in groundbreaking new programs and facilities, including the Dell Medical School, which welcomed its first class in 2016 and is central to the university’s efforts to transform health education and health care delivery. Diversity and inclusion are cornerstones of Fenves’ vision for higher education. In 2015, his administration successfully defended UT Austin’s admissions practices before the US Supreme Court. The landmark ruling in the Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin case enabled UT Austin to continue recruiting a diverse student body, so that all students have the educational benefits of a diverse learning environment. Fenves continues to spur innovation in higher education by advancing interdisciplinary collaboration, the integration of teaching and research and the continued evolution of student learning — both inside and outside of the classroom. He has also launched efforts to expand UT’s global reach and international opportunities for students and faculty. Fenves earned his bachelor’s degree from Cornell University and a master’s degree and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. He began his career in 1984 as an assistant professor in UT’s Department of Civil Engineering. He then served more than 20 years on the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, where he became an internationally renowned expert on structural engineering for earthquakes. Fenves is married to Carmel Martinez Fenves. They have two adult daughters, both of whom reside in Austin. In his spare time, Fenves enjoys reading both fiction and nonfiction and traveling with his family. Art galleries and museums are always at the top of their destination list.

Richard Flores

Richard Flores

Richard Flores, PhD, is Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for the College of Liberal Arts and Professor of Anthropology and Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin where I hold the C. B. Smith, Sr. Centennial Chair in U. S.—Mexico Relations.   Dr. Flores works in the areas of critical theory, performance studies, semiotics, and historical and cultural anthropology.  He is a native of San Antonio, Texas, and received his B.A. from the University of Notre Dame and Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in 1989. Dr. Flores is the author of Remembering the Alamo: Memory, Modernity, and the Master Symbol (University of Texas Press, 2002),  Los Pastores: History and Performance in the Mexican Shepherd’s Play of South Texas (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1995), editor of Adina De Zavala’s, History and Legends of the Alamo (Arte Público Press, 1996).  In addition, Dr. Flores has published essays in American Ethnologist, Cultural Anthropology, American Literary History, Radical History Review, and in the edited volume,Latino Cultural Citizenship, published by Beacon Press. In addition to his scholarly work, Dr. Flores has extensive experience in the area of curriculum development and international studies, particularly in Latin America and the Middle East. He oversees UTeach-Liberal Arts, the college’s secondary teacher preparation program in social studies, English, and foreign languages. Related to this is the Muslim Histories and Cultures Program, an education program for high school social studies teachers. More recently, Dr. Flores has developed the college’s new effort in international affairs, The Global Initiative for Education and Leadership. The initiative is a consortium of UT and partner units aimed at delivering educational and leadership training abroad.

Amy Garvey is a fourth-year medical student at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She received her undergraduate degree in Music at Columbia University. Amy is dedicated to health justice, anti-oppression, and multidisciplinary medical education. She is a member of the White Coats for Black Lives (WC4BL) national working group and works to support a movement of physician-activists committed to anti-racist, universal healthcare.

Michele Guzmán

Michele Guzmán

Michele Guzmán, Ph.D., is Vice President of Administration and Senior Director of Evaluation at the Meadows Mental Health Policy Institute. Dr. Guzmán oversees the human resources, operations, and grants/contract management for the institute. She also leads policy evaluation for the Institute. Dr. Guzmán has provided leadership for the Institute’s grant writing efforts, behavioral health systems assessments, and workforce development. Dr. Guzmán received her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from the University at Albany, State University of New York, and her bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Vassar College.

Joey Hannah

Joey Hannah

Joey Hannah, Ph.D., is a Diversity Counseling and Outreach Specialist and Staff Psychologist at the UT Austin Counseling and Mental Health Center.  Dr. Hannah earned his Ph.D., Counseling Psychology from the University of Florida. Among his services, he provides individual and group therapy, outreach, consultation, and crisis support, in addition to training/supervision for interns and practicum students. Joey serves as a Diversity Counseling and Outreach Specialists and liaison to the LGBTQ+ communities at UT. Professional interests include sexual, gender, and relationship diversity; racial justice and White allyship; psychological assessment; suicide prevention/intervention; trauma recovery; grief & loss; video game, internet, and technology issues. In his spare time, Joey enjoys video games, Netflix, traveling, food/cooking and reading.

Meeta Kumar

Meeta Kumar

Meeta Kumar, Ph.D., is a psychologist and an experienced professional in the field of college mental health. She currently serves as the Deputy Executive Director of Counseling and Psychological Services as well as adjunct faculty at the University of Pennsylvania. She is responsible for coordination, development and delivery of university-wide programs that support mental health and wellness of students. She works closely with all campus constituencies including faculty/staff, student groups and parents/families. She is a national presenter on an array of college mental health topics. She is adjunct faculty in the Asian American Studies department. She received her Ph.D. from the Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania.

Jeanne Manese

Jeanne Manese

Jeanne Manese, PhD, is Director Emerita of the Counseling Center at the University of California, Irvine, which, in 2013, was honored with the APA Suinn Achievement Award for demonstrated excellence in the recruitment, retention and graduation of ethnic minority students in doctoral psychology programs. Dr. Manese is published in the areas of multicultural supervision and training, mentoring, and strength based interventions for undergraduate well being and academic achievement.  Her most recent publication is Cases in Multicultural Clinical Supervision: Models, Lenses and Applications. Dr. Manese has achieved the distinction of Fellow in the American Psychological Association (Division 17 and 45) and is a Fellow of the Asian American Psychological Association. She has been honored by the Association of Counseling Center Training Agencies and the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers for her work in the area of multicultural training. Dr. Manese has additionally worked in hospital   settings, private practice and maintains a consultation practice. Dr. Manese completed a masters degree in Education from Harvard University and received her PhD from the University of Maryland, College Park with a specialization in Counseling Psychology. Dr. Manese continues her lifelong commitment to addressing disparities in mental health treatment for people of color, mentoring students from underrepresented backgrounds through the higher education pipeline, and promoting civil rights and social justice.

Octavio N. Martinez

Octavio N. Martinez

Octavio N. Martinez, M.D., M.B.A., M.P.H., is a native Texan and licensed psychiatrist and the fifth Executive Director to lead the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health since its creation in 1940 at The University of Texas at Austin, where he oversees the vision, mission, goals, strategic planning and day-to-day operations of the foundation. Dr. Martinez holds an appointment of Senior Associate Vice President within the university’s Division of Diversity and Community Engagement; he is also a clinical professor in the university’s School of Social Work; and holds an adjunct professor appointment at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry. His academic interests include minority health, health disparities and workforce issues. In addition to his administrative and academic duties, he currently serves on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s, Health and Medicine Division’s (HMD’s) Standing Committee on Medical and Public Health Research during Large-Scale Emergency Events and on HMD’s Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities. He has formerly served on the IOM’s Committee on the Governance and Financing of Graduate Medical Education (2014) and on the Committee on the Mental Health Workforce for Geriatric Populations (2012). From 2002 to 2006 he served as a Special Emphasis Panel Member for the National Institutes of Health, National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities. Dr. Martinez also serves on the National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services to the Secretary of Health. He is a member of the board of directors for Trust for America’s Health (TFAH), a member of the editorial board for the Home Health Care Services Quarterly Journal, and a member of The University of Texas – University Charter School Advisory Board. Dr. Martinez is a Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, a member of The American College of Psychiatrists, a member of The College of Behavioral Health Leadership, the National Hispanic Medical Association, the American Public Health Association, and the Texas Society for Psychiatric Physicians. In 2017, Dr. Martinez was named a Distinguished Alumnus by his high school: Stephen F. Austin High School in Austin, Texas. He is a recipient of the 2015 Psychiatric Excellence Award from the Texas Society of Psychiatric Physicians. He also received the National Alliance on Mental Illness Texas 2015 Mental Health Professional of the Year Award and was inducted into The Philosophical Society of Texas in 2015. He was awarded a Shining Lights Award for Excellence in Hispanic Mental Health Advocacy and Leadership in 2012 by the National Resource Center for Hispanic Mental Health and he is a recipient of the 2008 Adolph Meyer, M.D. Research Award in recognition of contributions in minority health and efforts to improve the mental health of all citizens regardless of socioeconomic status by The Center for Health Care Services. Dr. Martinez is licensed to practice medicine in Texas and North Carolina. Prior to joining the foundation in 2008, Dr. Martinez was a clinical psychiatrist at Albemarle Mental Health Center and an affiliate associate professor at the Brody School of Medicine in North Carolina. He was part of a team that created a 23-Hour Crisis Unit at Albemarle Hospital in Elizabeth City, North Carolina to serve a 10 county catchment area that includes the Outer Banks. Before that he was an assistant professor and psychiatrist at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and a Faculty Associate with the Center for Medical Humanities and Ethics. In San Antonio he served as Director of Psychiatric Consultation/Liaison Services for University Hospital and the Audie L. Murphy Veterans Administration Hospital. He also was Co-Director of Behavioral Sciences for the UTHSCSA medical school, and developed two community psychiatric clinics for underserved areas of San Antonio. Before entering medical school, Dr. Martinez worked in commercial real estate, banking, and finance. As a commercial real estate banker in Austin, Texas, he managed business parks, office buildings, and large tracts of commercial real estate. He has a master’s degree in public health from Harvard University’s School of Public Health, a doctor’s degree in medicine from Baylor College of Medicine, and master’s and bachelor’s degrees in business administration with a concentration in finance from The University of Texas at Austin. He was Chief Resident during his psychiatric training at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and is an alumnus of The Commonwealth Fund/Harvard University Fellowship in Minority Health Policy at Harvard Medical School.

Maurie McInnis

Maurie McInnis

Maurie McInnisPh.D., is the executive vice president and provost at The University of Texas at Austin. As the university’s chief academic officer, she leads strategic planning for the university’s academic mission, and ensures academic programs are world-class and aligned with the university’s commitment to diversity and equity. These responsibilities include leading academic programs and initiatives across the university’s 18 colleges and schools, which serve more than 51,000 students and support more than 3,000 teaching and research faculty. In addition, McInnis oversees UT Austin’s libraries and museums, archival collections, research centers, and academic support units. Working closely with deans and other academic leaders, McInnis’ responsibilities also span: Faculty recruitment, retention, and advancement; Enrollment management; Student success initiatives; Curriculum management; Resource management and academic space utilization; Accreditation and assessment; Institutional reporting; Non-residential, continuing education, and online offerings McInnis is a member of the Core Crisis Management Team, Texas Exes Board of Directors, University Budget Council, Executive Compliance Committee, and is co-chair of the Strategic Information Technology Accountability Board. Prior to serving as provost at The University of Texas at Austin, McInnis served the University of Virginia for almost 20 years in various academic and administrative appointments, including vice provost for academic affairs, associate dean for undergraduate academic programs in the College of Arts and Sciences, director of American Studies, and professor of art history. McInnis is a renowned scholar in the cultural history of American art in the colonial and antebellum south. She has published extensively on American art history, including four books that earned six awards. She has also served as curator for multiple museum exhibitions. McInnis earned a bachelor’s degree with highest distinction in art history from University of Virginia and a master’s degree and Ph.D., also in art history, from Yale University.

Leonard Moore

Leonard Moore

Leonard Moore, Ph.D., is George Littlefield Professor of American History and Senior Associate Vice-President for Campus Diversity, and the Interim Deputy Director for Minority Recruitment. Dr. Moore also directs two study abroad programs: Beijing and Cape Town. In his administrative capacity, Dr. Moore works closely with the following units: the office of the provost; student affairs; development; alumni affairs; intercollegiate athletics; and international studies. Dr. Moore’s current portfolio helps the university meet its strategic goals relative to diversity and it is a critical component of the university’s initiative to increase the four-year graduation rate. His research interests include Modern African American History; black urban history; intersection of race, sport, and hip-hop. Dr. Moore is author of numerous articles and the books, Black Rage in New Orleans: Police Brutality and African American Activism from World War II to Hurricane Katrina and Carl B. Stokes and the Rise of Black Political Power.

Amanda Muñoz-Martinéz

Amanda Muñoz-Martinéz

Amanda Muñoz-Martinéz is a Psychologist and Functional Analytic Psychotherapy Certified Trainer (FAP) with primary interests in research and clinical practice. Amanda is currently a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Nevada-Reno, and she is a psychology intern in The University of Texas at Austin. Amanda have two main research interests. First, conducting research that improves people’s interpersonal functioning and well-being. Second, investigating the relationship between therapies’ processes of change and outcomes to improve fidelity, effectiveness, and efficiency of psychological services.

Deborah Parra-Medina

Deborah Parra-Medina

Deborah Parra-Medina Ph.D., is the inaugural director of the Latino Research Initiative. She holds an appointment as Professor in the Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Professor Parra-Medina has extensive expertise in developing culturally competent public health, chronic disease, and healthy lifestyle interventions with underserved communities, including women, Latinos, financially disadvantaged, and immigrant populations. She uses a mixed-methods, community-based participatory approach, often designing and implementing interventions that utilize the promotora model and involve multimedia, text messaging, and other technological communications. Professor Parra-Medina comes to Austin from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio’s Institute for Health Promotion Research (IHPR), where she was a professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics from 2008 to 2016. From 1998 to 2008, she served on the faculty of the University of South Carolina’s Arnold School of Public Health. In 2016, Professor Parra-Medina was named a Fellow by the American Academy of Health Behavior, a national group of researchers who apply study results to improve public health. She has served as Co-Director of the South Texas Area Health Education Centers Program and as a member of the Cancer Prevention and Population Science research program at the Cancer Therapy and Research Center, a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. She serves on the editorial board of several scholarly journals and has been recognized for her work in public health and health disparities research by the American Public Health Association, receiving the Mayhew Derryberry Award in 2013. Professor Parra-Medina received her Ph.D. in public health epidemiology from the University of California, San Diego/San Diego State University joint doctoral program and her master’s in public health in health promotion and education from San Diego State University. She is a native of San Diego. Her research interests include: community-based health promotion, underserved communities, participatory research methods, Latino health disparities, and chronic disease prevention. Her current research includes: Healthy Frio, ¡Míranos!, and Entre Familia.

Annelle Primm

Annelle Primm

Annelle B. Primm, M.D., MPH is a psychiatrist who has lectured and written widely on community psychiatry and cultural psychiatry, including two books she co-edited, Disparities in Psychiatric Care, published in 2010 and the 2012 book, Women in Psychiatry: Personal Perspectives. Well-known for her leadership in educating the public about mental illness, Dr. Primm produced the culturally-tailored DVD, Black and Blue: Depression in the African American Community. Dr. Primm was a physician executive at the American Psychiatric Association (APA) from 2004-2015 a period during which she led APA’s Division of Diversity and Health Equity and served as Deputy Medical Director. Prior to her service at the APA, Dr. Primm was Medical Director of the Johns Hopkins Hospital Community Psychiatry Program where she oversaw a variety of mental health services for adults.  Dr. Primm is currently an adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Howard University, Johns Hopkins and New York University Schools of Medicine, and is Senior Medical Adviser for the Steve Fund. A Distinguished Fellow of the APA and a member of the American College of Psychiatrists, Dr. Primm has received numerous awards and honors including the Alexandra Symonds Award from the American Psychiatric Association Foundation in 2016. A graduate of Harvard for undergraduate studies, Dr. Primm received her medical degree from Howard University College of Medicine and psychiatry residency training at Johns Hopkins. She completed, also from Johns Hopkins, a master’s degree in public health and a fellowship in Social and Community Psychiatry.

Mehraz Rahman

Mehraz Rahman

Mehraz Rahman is a senior at the University of Texas at Austin studying marketing and Plan II Honors. She’s from Austin, Texas and she is the second Bangladeshi-American woman to serve as UT’s Student Body Vice President. She is involved with civic engagement and activism efforts on campus and around Austin. She has worked with the Counseling and Mental Health Center on campus as well as the non-profit organization MannMukti to promote awareness about mental health, particularly in the South Asian community.

Katy Redd

Katy Redd

Katy Redd, M.P.H., M.S.W., oversees prevention programming, media relations, and development for UT Austin’s Counseling and Mental Health Center and University Health Services. She helps to lead the team of ten full-time staff members who plan, develop and implement innovative public health programming.  This work includes mental health promotion, suicide prevention, high risk drinking prevention, prescription drug misuse prevention, healthy sleep promotion, bystander intervention, and interpersonal violence prevention.  Katy works to forge new campus partnerships to support best practices in health promotion and meet the needs of today’s college students.  Under her leadership, the Counseling and Mental Health Center was awarded a three-year grant by the Hogg Foundation to develop the “Well-being in Learning Environments” project—an initiative that embeds conditions for well-being directly in classroom environments.  Katy’s professional interests include health communication, public health methods to improve mental health, and health equity. Katy has a Masters in Public Health and a Masters in Social Work from New Mexico State University, and is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who served in Belize.  In her free time, Katy enjoys hiking, traveling, and watching her young children experience the world.

Mary Roessel

Mary Roessel

Mary Hasbah Roessel, M.D., is a Navajo board-certified psychiatrist practicing in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  She received her medical degree at the University of Minnesota and returned to the southwest to complete her residency in psychiatry at the University of New Mexico.  She received an APA/ NIMH Fellowship during her residency and has since worked for twenty-five years with Indigenous peoples of the southwest, Alaska, and British Columbia.  She has a special expertise in cultural psychiatry.  She grew up on the Navajo reservation with her parents and grandparents.  Her grandfather was a revered Navajo medicine man.  She worked with Navajo medicine men and women to provide cultural orientation for behavioral health staff. She was the lead facilitator to the Indigenous Cultural competency course for the APA.  She presented on a panel discussing Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women at the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women in March 2016. In May 2017 at the APA Annual meeting she presented on a panel on the Steve Fund with Dr. Annelle Primm, and spoke on “Focusing on the Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing of Indigenous College Students”.

Evan M. Rose

Evan M. Rose is co-founder and president of The Steve Fund, the nation’s only organization focused on supporting the mental health and emotional well-being of college students of color. Evan came up with the idea of starting the Fund days after the passing of his brother and best friend, Steve, who died from mental illness in 2014. Steve had received a master in psychology and was deeply supportive of the well-being of others. The Steve Fund is the legacy of a gifted, loving, and compassionate young man who felt called to help others. The Fund works with colleges and universities, outstanding non-profits, researchers, students, emerging adults, mental health practitioners and experts, and with groups serving diverse populations to stimulate dialogue and promote effective programs and strategies that build understanding and assistance for the mental and emotional health of the nation’s students of color as they enter, matriculate in, and transition from higher education. Its core pillars are knowledge building, programs and partnerships, youth engagement, and tech innovations. The Steve Fund’s work has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Diverse Magazine, The Chronicle of Higher Education, The Huffington Post and The Harvard Crimson. Mr. Rose is a graduate of Harvard College and resides in New York with his wife.

Rene Salazar

Rene Salazar

René Salazar, M.D. is the assistant dean for diversity and professor of medical education at Dell Medical School at The University of Texas at Austin. He is a graduate of The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Medicine and completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. After residency, Salazar completed a one-year Latino Health Disparities research fellowship supported by the UCSF Division of General Internal Medicine and Medical Effectiveness Research Center for Diverse Populations. He was a faculty member in the Division of General Internal Medicine from 2003 until June 2016. Salazar has over a decade of experience supporting diversity and promoting an inclusive climate. As the chair of the UCSF Department of Medicine’s Residency Diversity Committee and the director of diversity for the Office of Graduate Medical Education, Salazar led efforts to recruit diverse residents and clinical fellows to UCSF. Salazar also helped develop a UCSF campus-wide unconscious bias educational initiative to increase awareness and provide skills to address unconscious bias among UCSF faculty, staff, students and trainees. Salazar has presented his work at national meetings including the Association of American Medical Colleges, the Society of General Internal Medicine and the Society of Hospital Medicine. His work has also been featured on NPR.

Delida Sanchez

Delida Sanchez

Delida Sanchez, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, College of Education at UT Austin. Dr. Sanchez is interested in teaching and research in the area of multicultural counseling. In addition to exploring ethnic and racial identity development, she focuses on racism and health disparities in behavioral and mental health among Black and Latino populations. Dr. Sanchez earned her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Columbia University Teachers College, her M.S.Ed. in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard University Graduate School of Education, and her B.A. in Psychology and Latin American Studies from Binghampton University.

Ryan Sutton

Ryan Sutton

Ryan Sutton, Ph.D., is Director, African American Male Research Initiative; Director, Greater Austin Area My Brother’s Keeper Initiative; and a Mental Health Specialist. As a Director with the Longhorn Center for Academic Excellence (LCAE), which is based in the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement at the University of Texas at Austin.  He directs two initiatives and spearheads mental health support for students within the center, while overseeing the personal development suite of the center. Dr. Sutton holds a Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Howard University, where his research and clinical interest was rooted in academic and behavioral outcomes for students of color.  He focuses his work around resiliency, mental health, trauma outcomes, and behavior.  Prior to serving in his current role, Dr. Sutton performed forensic evaluations and therapy within the D.C. Superior Court system in Washington, D.C., focused primarily with children and youth. 

Ussama Taha is a bi-racial, multicultural, graduate student at the University of Texas at Austin with roots from Khartoum, Sudan and Cody, Wyoming.  After spending a decade working as a television reporter and producer in Dubai, he made the decision to leave that career behind and become a social worker.  A passionate traveler who has visited 35 countries, Ussama now translates this passion of exploration into exploring the worlds within himself and his clients.  He also enjoys making people laugh, playing volleyball, and warm weather.

Amy Tao-Foster

Amy Tao-Foster

Amy Tao-Foster, LPC serves as a Diversity Coordinator & Outreach Specialist, in the UT Austin Counseling and Mental Health Center. Ms. Tao-Foster is a second-generation Vietnamese American grew up in the Texas Panhandle as the middle child in a refugee immigrant family.  She is a licensed professional counselor and serves as a Diversity, Counseling & Outreach Specialist for UTCMHC and in partnership with the UT Center for Asian American Studies. Her clinical and research interests include examining the impact of intergenerational trauma on students of color, exploring the Asian/Asian American identity, and increasing awareness and reducing stigma around mental health treatment for people of color. She advocates for the use of culturally informed clinical interventions and practices, emphasizes examining psychotherapy through a lens of equity, inclusion, and encourages students to examine how their every-day use of technology and consumption of multi-media and social media intersect with their mental health and well-being.

Brendesha Tynes

Brendesha Tynes

Brendesha Tynes, Ph.D., is an associate professor of Education and Psychology at the USC Rossier School of Education. Her research focuses on youth experiences with digital media, and how they are associated with academic and socio-emotional outcomes. She is also interested in equity in digital literacy, which includes empowering uses of digital tools for underrepresented youth. She is currently principal investigator on three primary projects: The Teen Life Online and in Schools Project (TLOS), the E-Cope Project, and the Digital Equity Project. The TLOS Project is an NIH-funded, mixed-method, longitudinal study of online racial discrimination—also  called race-related cyberbullying—and the assets and resources youth possess that buffer its effects on mental health, problem behavior and academic outcomes. More specifically, the study uses a risk and resilience framework to explain the differential outcomes among adolescents exposed to similar risks online.  Although the internet may threaten social identity and adjustment, particularly for adolescents of color, individual (e.g. coping) and contextual (e.g. parental support) factors mitigate such risks. The E-Cope Project includes the design of a theory-driven mobile intervention (i.e. an app) to enhance adolescents’ ability to cope with online racial discrimination. In addition, a randomized controlled trial is used to determine whether the intervention is effective at enhancing youth ability to critique negative messages and use adaptive coping strategies. The Digital Equity Project is a mixed-method, multiple case study of the use of mobile devices in K-12 urban schools and the individual, environmental and technological factors that enhance academic and socio-emotional learning. One of the primary goals of this project is to better understand the unique challenges and best practices (including pedagogical strategies) of teachers in schools that serve primarily African American and Latino youth.  Tynes has published widely, including in the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, Cyberpsychology & Behavior, the Journal of Adolescent Health and Developmental Psychology. She has also been cited in numerous media outlets, including the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Newsweek and Woman’s Day. She is the co-editor of the Handbook of African American Psychology and associate editor of the American Educational Research Journal. Tynes also teaches courses on lifespan development, African American child development and new media literacy. Tynes is a former high school history and global studies teacher. Before her current position at USC Rossier, Tynes held assistant and associate professor positions in African American Studies, Educational Psychology and Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She has also been a research fellow in the Department of Society, Human Development and Health at Harvard University. She earned a B.A. in History from Columbia University, an M.A. in Learning Sciences from Northwestern University and a Ph.D. in Human Development and Psychology from UCLA. Dr. Tynes has received multiple honors and awards including: 2015 Spencer Foundation Midcareer Award, 2015 American Educational Research Association Early Career Award, 2012 AERA Early Career Contribution Award- Committee on Scholars of Color, Diverse Magazine’s Emerging Scholars under 40, Weintraub Faculty Prize for Innovation in the Use of Technology for Learning, YWCA Racial and Social Justice Award.

 

Carmen Valdez

Carmen Valdez

Carmen R. Valdez, Ph.D., is an associate professor at the Steve Hicks School of Social Work. She has a joint appointment as associate professor of community engagement and health equity in the Department of Population Health, Dell Medical School. Prior to this appointment, she was an associate professor in the Department of Counseling Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW), where she worked for 12 years. At UW she co-led the Latino Equity Collaborative (LEC), an advisory board of community and academic partners that leverages social capital, community experience, and university research and resources to address educational and health equity for Latinos in Madison and across the state. LEC secured funding to collaborate with state educational agencies to evaluate the formal and informal roles of language aides in urban and rural schools as they bridge between Latina/o immigrant families and schools. Valdez has a special interest in understanding family stability and stress. She is associate editor of the journal Family Process. In her family research, she examines the role of social policy, neighborhood, and family factors on immigrant personal and family health, as well as developing community-based, family-focused interventions for Latino immigrant families. At UW, she led a dissemination and implementation project to scale up her family-focused intervention for Latina/o families affected by maternal depression, Fortalezas Familiares (Family Strengths). The program is currently being implemented in select schools in Milwaukee and Madison. She has also led a case study of immigration policy and its role in health, focusing on following longitudinally four families in Arizona. Valdez is also interested in mentoring health equity scholars and junior faculty of color. At UW, she was the faculty director of the Advancing Health Equity and Diversity (AHEAD) program, of the Collaborative Center for Health Equity, UW Institute for Clinical and Translational Research. In this role, she led five affiliated AHEAD program directors in developing a community of scholarship in which authentic leadership, research career development, and networking opportunities were offered to early to mid-career health equity scholars at UW. She looks forward to continuing and expanding these endeavors at The University of Texas at Austin.

 

 

Sarah Vinson

Sarah Vinson

Sarah Y. Vinson, M.D., is a physician who specializes in adult, child & adolescent, and forensic psychiatry. She is the founder of the Lorio Psych Group, an Atlanta, GA based mental health practice providing expert care and consultation. After graduating from medical school at the University of Florida with Research Honors and as an Inductee in the Chapman Humanism Honors Society, she completed her general psychiatry training at Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School. While there, she also received specialized training in trauma through the Victims of Violence Program. She then returned to the South to complete fellowships in both child & adolescent and forensic psychiatry at Emory University School of Medicine. In addition to providing mental health care services such as psychotherapy, consultation and psychopharmacology through her private practice, Dr. Vinson is an Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at Morehouse School of Medicine. Just two years after joining the faculty she was honored as Psychiatry and Faculty of the Year in 2015. She is also Adjunct Faculty at Emory University School of Medicine. She has been elected and/or appointed to national and statewide office by her professional peers. She is the Immediate Past President of the Georgia Council on Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and the Secretary of the Georgia Psychiatric Physicians Association. Additionally, she serves on the Communications Council of the American Psychiatric Association and previously served on the Early Career Psychiatrist Representative on the Board of the American Association of Community Psychiatrists. She has been a speaker at national conferences including the American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Annual Meeting and The National Urban League Annual Meeting.. Dr. Vinson has received numerous awards in recognition of her service and leadership including the University of Florida College of Medicine Outstanding Young Alumna Award and Finalist for the Atlanta Business Chronicle Healthcare Hero Award.

Whitney Williams

Whitney Wiliams

Whitney Williams is a third-year medical student and member of the inaugural class at UT Austin Dell Medical School. She is originally from Upstate NY, but left the Northeast early on to attend Davidson College, just outside of Charlotte, NC. There, she graduated with a B.S. in Biology. She remained in North Carolina for a year to participate in a one-year fellowship through Davidson to expose recent graduates to the non-profit sector, where she was involved in numerous projects around implicit bias in women’s health, sexual and domestic violence, and substance dependence in pregnancy. Her passion for racial health disparities allowed her the opportunity to become part of the first class at Dell Med and continue those efforts here.

Thea Woodruff

Thea Woodruff

Thea Woodruff, Ph.D., coordinates the Well-Being in Learning Environments project at the Counseling and Mental Health Center (CMHC) at the University of Texas at Austin. On this project, Dr. Woodruff works with faculty to imbed practices for improving student well-being in their classes. She also teaches courses as a lecturer in the College of Education. Before working at the CMHC, Dr. Woodruff worked as a researcher, professional development creator, and technical assistance provider at the Meadows Center for Prevention of Educational Risk at UT Austin. She has also worked as a district-level administrator in a school district and as a consultant supporting state-, district-, and campus-level literacy initiatives.