Abby Belani

Abby Belani

Abhilasha, or Abby Belani, recently graduated in Stanford’s Class of 2015 with a BA in Psychology and is now on track to medical school. She has been a peer counselor, a residential advisor, a Stanford Women in Medicine mentor, and the ASSU Director of Emotional Wellbeing through her four years as an undergraduate student, earning an Award of Excellence from the Stanford Alumni Association. Currently, she works as a Project Specialist on Stanford’s new OpenXChange initiative, through the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, and is writing a series of short stories examining mental health conditions in adolescence.

Dr. Byron D. Clift Breland

Dr. Byron D. Clift Breland

Dr. Byron D. Clift Breland was unanimously selected as the President of San Jose City College effective May of 2014, after having served as the interim president since June 2013. Dr. Clift Breland holds a Bachelor of Science in Consumer Economics and a Master of Science in Family Studies from the University of Maryland, College Park. He subsequently completed a Master of Science in Education and a Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from the University of Southern California. He was honored as a Presidential Fellow at the University of Southern California and received outstanding graduate student awards from both USC and the University of Maryland. Dr. Clift Breland comes to San Jose City College from the Long Beach Community College District, where he served as the Associate Vice President of the Pacific Coast Campus for five years. Under his leadership as the primary executive administrative officer on the campus, he ensured that the academic and student services and administrative operations functioned effectively. While holding administrative positions at the University of Maryland at College Park and the University of Southern California, he successfully led community development, outreach, and student success initiatives. His educational career also includes serving as an Assistant Dean and Director of Judicial Affairs at the University of California, Irvine; Associate Dean of Student Development at Santa Ana College; and Dean of Student Affairs at Long Beach City College. Dr. Clift Breland’s instructional experience includes being an eighth grade English teacher in Prince George’s County, Maryland; teaching Community College Administration at the University of Southern California; and being a Learning Skills instructor in the School of Education at the University of Southern California, where he taught academic success skills to student athletes and first-generation college students. He has also taught Leadership Skill Development to community members in the City of Santa Ana and developed a Conflict Resolution course for student leaders at the University of California, Irvine. A few of Dr. Clift Breland’s publications and presentations include: “Factors Influencing the Educational and Career Transitions of African American and Latino Community College Students”; “Assessing the Degree Aspirations of African American and Latino Community College Students”; and “Using Civic Engagement at a Community College to Develop Community Leaders”. He has also been active in the broader community, serving on a number of boards to promote equity in housing and economic opportunities. His extensive work creating strategic community partnerships, particularly in urban environments, has successfully served the needs of traditionally underrepresented students in higher education, such as African Americans, Latinos, and Asian Pacific Islanders, or those who are the first in their family to attend college.

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Jan Collins-Eaglin, Ph.D.

Jan Collins-Eaglin, Ph.D.: I am a psychologist who specializes in collegiate mental health issues and depression among African American women. I currently am the Associate Dean of Students for Wellness and Personal Success at Pomona College. I was the Director of the Michigan State University Counseling Center, Student Support Services – which includes Counseling and Psychological Services, Disability Services and the Academic Success Center. I was the P.I. for the Garrett Lee Smith Campus Suicide Prevention grant, P.I. for the VOCA Sexual Assault Program, Co-P.I. for the MSU Creating Inclusive Excellence grant, 2010-Towards a Culturally Adapted Model of Risk and Protective Factors for African American Women College Student’s Mental Health at Michigan State University, and P.I. VAWA grant for Campus Safety Grant at Wayne State University. As a psychologist my focus has been in the area of developing programs that promote psychological wellness and supports academic success. I completed my PhD, Ed.S, and MA degrees in the Combined Program of Education and Psychology at the University of Michigan. I am active nationally in professional organizations such as the American Psychological Association, and was chair of the Section for College and University Counseling Center in Division 17 and contributed on a national report about college student mental health. I served on the accreditation board of the International Association of Counseling Centers. I hold national leadership roles in African American women’s organizations. In The Links, Inc. I was the Dean of the Scott Hawkins Leadership Institute, and chapter president of the Ann Arbor Chapter of The Links, Incorporated. I currently am the chair an initiative on Mental Health for the international organization. As a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, I chaired the mental health initiative as part of the international program committee from 2006-2010, and was chapter president of the East Lansing chapter of the sorority.

Alia Crum

Alia Crum

Alia Crum: My research focuses on how changes in subjective mindsets – the lenses through which information is perceived, organized, and interpreted – can alter objective reality through behavioral, psychological, and physiological mechanisms. My work is, in part, inspired by research on the placebo effect, a remarkable and consistent demonstration of the ability of the mindset to elicit healing properties in the body. I am interested in understanding how mindsets affect important outcomes outside the realm of medicine, in the domains of behavioral health and organizational behavior. More specifically, I aim to understand how mindsets can be consciously and deliberately changed through intervention to affect organizational and individual performance, physiological and psychological well-being, and interpersonal effectiveness.

Dr. Linda Darling-Hammond

Dr. Linda Darling-Hammond

Linda Darling-Hammond is Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education Emeritus at Stanford University and President of the Learning Policy Institute, which connects research to policy and practice in the cause of more equitable and empowering learning. At Stanford, she founded the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education and the School Redesign Network and served as the faculty sponsor of the Stanford Teacher Education Program, which she helped to redesign. Before joining Stanford, she was the William F. Russell Professor of Education at Columbia University’s Teachers College, and a Senior Social Scientist and director of the education program at the RAND Corporation. From 1994–2001, Darling-Hammond served as the founding director of the National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future, whose 1996 report What Matters Most: Teaching for America’s Future led to sweeping policy changes affecting teaching and was named one of the most influential reports affecting U.S. education in that decade. In 2006, Darling-Hammond was named one of the nation’s ten most influential people affecting educational policy. She served as the leader of President Barack Obama’s education policy transition team in 2008. Darling-Hammond began her career as a public school teacher and co-founded both a preschool and a public high school. She has consulted widely with federal, state, and local officials and educators on strategies for improving education policies and practices. Among her more than 500 publications are a number of award-winning books, including The Right to Learn, Teaching as the Learning Profession, Preparing Teachers for a Changing World, and The Flat World and Education. She is past president of the American Educational Research Association and recipient of its awards for Distinguished Contributions to Research, Lifetime Achievement, and Research-to-Policy. She is also a two-term member of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, and a member of both the American Association of Arts and Sciences and of the National Academy of Education. Darling-Hammond is recipient of 14 honorary degrees and numerous awards for the quality and impact of her research, including the prestigious Grawemeyer Award, the Brock International Prize, the McGraw Hill Award for Innovation, and the Pomeroy Award for Outstanding Research. She received an Ed.D. from Temple University (with highest distinction) and a B.A. from Yale University (magna cum laude).

Blanca Diaz

Blanca Diaz

Blanca Diaz is a sophomore at Stanford University. Although she has not declared a major, she is currently working towards pursuing a degree in Computer Science and a minor in Education. Outside of class, Blanca can be found organizing events for student organizations such as FLIP (First Generation and/or Low Income Partnership), La Familia de Stanford (Latin@ LGBT+ community), or mentoring students back in her hometown of East Palo Alto. In the future, Blanca aspires to work in improving the access and quality of math education in communities similar to East Palo Alto.

Dr. MarYam Hamedani

Dr. MarYam Hamedani

Dr. MarYam Hamedani is Associate Director of the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CCSRE) at Stanford University. As a social and cultural psychologist with her PhD from Stanford, Dr. Hamedani’s expertise lies in understanding the ways in which culture, race, ethnicity, and social class structure society and, in turn, shape people’s identities, everyday experiences, and access to opportunities. Her current work as a scholar-practitioner centers on fostering more inclusive and equitable college environments, helping students from diverse backgrounds think and talk about difference in empowering ways, and improving students’ educational outcomes through social and emotional learning and social justice education-based strategies. She has also researched how American individualism can influence the ways in which people experience and interpret social justice issues in the U.S. Her work has been published in leading journals such as Psychological Science and Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, and has been covered by national media outlets such as National Public Radio, ABC News, The Boston Globe, The Atlantic, and The Huffington Post. Prior to joining CCSRE, Dr. Hamedani was Associate Director of the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education (SCOPE) in the Graduate School of Education.

Dr. Rona Hu

Dr. Rona Hu

Dr. Rona J. Hu graduated from the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine in 1990 and completed residency in psychiatry at UCSF in1994. She received fellowships at the National Institutes of Health in Neuroscience and Schizophrenia Research. She is Clinical Associate Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine and Medical Director of the Acute Inpatient Unit at Stanford Hospital. She works in Stanford, CA and specializes in Psychiatry. Dr. Hu is affiliated with Stanford Health Care.

Dr. Wei-Chin Hwang

Dr. Wei-Chin Hwang

Wei-Chin Hwang, Ph.D., is a Professor of Clinical Psychology at Claremont McKenna College. He received his Ph.D. from the clinical psychology program at UCLA (2003), completed his pre-doctoral fellowship at Richmond Area Multi-Services (RAMS) – National Asian American Psychology Training Center, and completed a clinical-research postdoctoral fellowship at Harbor UCLA Medical Center. His research focuses on understanding and reducing mental health disparities, psychotherapy process and outcomes, improving therapist cultural competency and effectiveness when working with people from different backgrounds, and developing models and frameworks for culturally adapting therapy for ethnic minorities. His work has been recognized by a number of professional organizations, and he was awarded the American Psychological Association Minority Fellowship Program Early Career Award, the Asian American Psychological Association Early Career Award and inducted as a Fellow, and the Enrico E. Jones Award for Research in Psychotherapy and Clinical Psychology by the Western Psychological Association and inducted as a Fellow. He is also a licensed clinical psychologist and has an independent practice in Pasadena and Claremont, California.

Dr. Shashank Joshi

Dr. Shashank Joshi

Dr. Shashank Joshi’s teaching and research focuses on increasing knowledge and enhancing effectiveness of school mental health, pediatric psychotherapy and medication interventions. Areas of study include: the therapeutic alliance in medical care, structured psychotherapy interventions in school settings, cultural issues in pediatrics, and faculty development in graduate medical education.

LaframboiseDr. LaFromboise is concerned with helping students from non-dominant ethnic/racial groups survive the influence of acculturation, perceived discrimination, and multiple stressors that are so typical — and often so neglected — in children and adolescents. As a counseling psychologist with clinical and teaching experience in a wide variety of university and American Indian/Alaska Native reservation/village school settings, Dr. LaFromboise is well-equipped to guide new professionals in school and community based counseling interventions. She is the developer of the American Indian Life Skills Development Curriculum of problem-based lessons aimed at increasing social emotional competence and peer leadership to reduce the risk of suicide among American Indian/Alaska Native adolescents. Proven successful with high school students, this curriculum is being extended to younger students and evaluated in a multi-site effectiveness study. She is also investigating social and psychological indicators of academic engagement among American Indian youth.

Dr. Jeanne Manese

Dr. Jeanne Manese

Jeanne Manese, Ph.D. is Director of the Counseling Center at the University of California, Irvine. She earned her B.A in psychology from the University of California, Irvine and also completed a masters degree in Education (M.Ed.) from Harvard University. Dr. Manese subsequently received her Ph.D. from the University of Maryland, College Park with a specialization in Counseling Psychology. She was awarded an American Psychological Association (APA) Minority Fellowship for her doctoral studies. Dr. Manese achieved the distinction of Fellow in the American Psychological Association (Division 17 and 45) and continues active involvement with the APA Minority Fellowship Program. Dr. Manese is also an active member of the Asian American Psychological Association. In 2013, her Counseling Center was honored with the APA Richard Suinn Achievement Award for demonstrated excellence in the recruitment, retention and graduation of ethnic minority students in doctoral psychology programs. Dr. Manese has published numerous articles and chapters related to training and practice with a focus on multicultural competency and social justice. She is currently conducting research and implementing programs focused on strength based interventions to enhance student retention at the university level.  The Goals in Action program received a Program Excellence award from the Organization of Counseling Center Directors in Higher Education (O.C.C.D.H.E.). Dr. Manese was among the University of California co-investigators in a 6.9M state funded mental health grant (CalMHSA-SMHI) aimed at stigma reduction and suicide prevention and she continues to be active in this arena. Included in her work in higher education and mental health, Dr. Manese has practiced around the world with the Semester at Sea program as well as teaches a fieldwork course for undergraduates interested in psychology and public health. Dr. Manese has also worked in hospital settings, private practice and maintains a consultation practice.

Dr. Alejandro M Martinez

Dr. Alejandro M Martinez

Alejandro M Martinez, Ph.D., is currently Associate Dean of Students and Lecturer at the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. Dr. Alejandro M. Martínez received his B.A. in Social Relations from Harvard University, and his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Michigan. His areas of special interest include mental health promotion and risk reduction. His work has involved the implementation of strategies that enhance protective psychological and social factors as well as initiatives that contribute to the reduction of risk factors for Stanford students at an individual, community and policy level. Alejandro’s psychological areas of expertise include: anxiety and stress management, conflict resolution, threat assessment, suicide risk assessment, dual career couples, procrastination, life transitions, psychological assessment and crisis intervention. Especially versed in working with culturally diverse individuals. Bicultural and bilingual in Spanish.

Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton

Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton

Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton has lived in Mexico, Ivory Coast, Thailand, and the United States. These travels cemented an early interest in culture and intergroup relations. After receiving his B.A. at Yale University, he pursued a Ph.D. in social psychology at Columbia University under the mentorship of Walter Mischel and Geraldine Downey. He remained at Columbia for postdoctoral training, and joined the psychology faculty at the University of California, Berkeley in 2002. His professional interests include stereotyping and prejudice from the perspective of both target and perceiver, intergroup relations, cultural psychology, and educational achievement. He is co-editor of the edited volume “Are We Born Racist?” from Beacon Press, and writes a blog for Psychology Today by the same name.

Virgil

Virgil Moorehead Jr. Psy.D.

Virgil Moorehead Jr. Psy.D. is from the Wright Institute in Berkeley, CA. Doctoral Internship: University of Michigan; Post-doctoral Fellowship: Stanford Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS); Research focus: American Indian Mental Health. My dissertation research was on Urban American Indians and their experiences in Digital Storytelling (Explored the ways in which digital storytelling promotes wellness for Urban American Indians). Presently: Work as a Staff Psychologist at Stanford Counseling and Psychological Services specializing in clinical work with American Indian students.

Dr. Cindy Ng

Dr. Cindy Ng

Cindy Ng is Associate Dean of Students and Director of the Asian American Activities Center at Stanford University. Since joining the A³C staff in 1991, Cindy has worked with faculty, staff and alumni to build community and to create programming and opportunities that support students in their academic and co-curricular endeavors. Cindy works with students on programming, leadership development, and advising and collaborates with campus partners to ensure that the needs of students are met. In 2006-2007, Cindy collaborated with CAPS counselors to create a mental health survey that was distributed to Asian American undergraduate and graduate students. Data from the survey was used to create mental health and well being programming. Cindy also serves on various University committees. Cindy is a longtime Alameda resident who graduated from UC Berkeley with a BA in Math. Prior to coming to Stanford, she spent time in New York working as a speechwriter for David N. Dinkins who became the first African American Mayor in New York City.

Yasmin Owusu, MD

Yasmin Owusu, MD

Yasmin Owusu, MD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Stanford University. She is trained in adult, child, and adolescent psychiatry. As a psychotherapist and pharmacotherapist, she currently treats primarily Stanford students. She is also the Director of Pre-Clerkship Psychiatric Education for the Stanford School of Medicine.

Carole Pertofsky, M.Ed.

Carole Pertofsky, M.Ed.

Carole Pertofsky, M.Ed. is Director of Wellness and Health Promotion Services at Vaden Health Center at Stanford University. Her work focuses on teaching students the science and art of human flourishing, and supporting students to find meaning, purpose and achieve success in their academic, creative and personal lives. Her courses include “The Pursuit of Happiness and Health”, “Exploring Happiness and Compassion”, and “Health Promotion and the Campus Culture”. Carole directed and presented at Stanford University’s first conference on positive psychology “Happiness Within Reach” drawing 20 presenters and 400 participants. She also oversees campus health and wellness education services for students. Carole is co-founder pf Spiritual Tools for Healing, a non-profit organization that offers groups and seminars for individuals with life-threatening and chronic illnesses, including classes on mindfulness practice and the arts. Her private coaching/counseling practice integrates positive psychology and basic neuroscience. She is a frequent lecturer, national speaker, and conducts seminars at the Stanford Continuing Studies, Esalen Institute, UC Berkeley, the Stanford Women’s Healthy Living Retreat, and other organizations. Carole’s past experience also includes: Director, Health Promotion Unit at the U.S. Army Command in Berlin, Germany where she received an Outstanding Recognition Award; Director, Community Wellness Programs at Washington Hospital in Fremont; and Project Consultant for Healthy Kids Healthy California Project at the California Department of Education. Carole is the recipient of a number of grants and awards, including the Stanford University Margaret Ann Fidler award for exceptional service to the Stanford campus.

Dr. Annelle Primm

Dr. Annelle Primm

Annelle B. Primm, M.D., MPH, is a community psychiatrist currently serving as the Senior Psychiatrist Advisor Urban Behavioral Associates and medical expert for the Steve Fund.  Dr. Primm was a physician executive at the American Psychiatric Association (APA) from 2004-2015 a period during which she led APA’s Division of Diversity and Health Equity and served as Deputy Medical Director.  Prior to her service at the APA, Dr. Primm was Medical Director of the Johns Hopkins Hospital Community Psychiatry Program where she oversaw a variety of mental health services for adults. Well known for her leadership of community collaborations, Dr. Primm is the Convener and Chair of the All Healers Mental Health Alliance, a national network of mental health professionals, health advocates and faith community leaders that facilitates culturally competent responses to the mental health needs of people affected by disasters.  Dr. Primm has lectured and written widely on public mental health and is a co-editor of the 2012 book, Disparities in Psychiatric Care. She is an adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Howard University College of Medicine, the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and New York University School of Medicine.

Dr. Laura Roberts

Dr. Laura Roberts

Laura Roberts, M.D., M.A., serves as Chairman and the Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She is an internationally recognized scholar in bioethics, psychiatry, medicine, and medical education, and is identified as the foremost psychiatric ethicist in this field. Dr. Roberts has received extensive scientific peer-reviewed funding from the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Energy, and private foundations to perform empirical studies of modern ethical issues in research, clinical care, and health policy, with a particular focus on vulnerable and special populations. Her work has led to advances in understanding of ethical aspects of physical and mental illness research, societal implications for genetic innovation, the role of stigma in health disparities, the impact of medical student and physician health issues, and optimal approaches to fostering professionalism in medicine. Dr. Roberts has written hundreds of peer-reviewed articles and other scholarly works, and she has written or edited several books in the areas of professionalism and ethics in medicine, professional development for physicians, and clinical psychiatry. Dr. Roberts has been the Editor-in-Chief for the journal Academic Psychiatry since 2002 and serves as an editorial board member and peer reviewer for many scientific and education journals. Dr. Roberts was the first woman to be elected President of the American Association of Chairs of Departments of Psychiatry. She was chosen to receive the Distinguished Psychiatrist award from the American Psychiatric Association, in 2005 and 2010 and was recognized as the foremost leader in psychiatric education in the United States and Canada by the University of Toronto in 2008. Dr. Roberts has also received numerous awards for leadership, teaching, and science, including the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Academic Psychiatry in 2010, the Nancy C.A. Roeske, M.D., Certificate of Recognition for Excellence in Medical Student Education from the American Psychiatric Association and the Faculty Teaching Excellence Award from the Education Council at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. Having received her Bachelor of Arts in History and Master of Arts in the Conceptual Foundations of Science from the University of Chicago, she then completed her medical degree and a fellowship in clinical medical ethics at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. Dr. Roberts then performed her residency training in psychiatry at University of New Mexico School of Medicine, where she also received additional clinical preparation in child and adolescent psychiatry. Dr. Roberts served on the faculty of University of New Mexico School of Medicine for nine years, performing evidence-based ethics research, administration, education, and clinical work in the specialized area of consultation-liaison psychiatry. While serving as Dr. Roberts Professor and Vice Chairman for her Department, she established the University of New Mexico Institute for Ethics and was appointed the Jack and Donna Rust Professor of Biomedical Ethics prior to her departure in 2003. She then moved to the Medical College of Wisconsin, where for seven years she served as chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and the Charles E. Kubly Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine. Dr. Roberts and her husband Mr. Eric Termuehlen joined the Palo Alto community when she arrived at Stanford in 2010. They have six children and one grandchild.

Evan Rose

Evan Rose

Evan Rose is president of the Steve Fund, an organization he co-founded in memory of his beloved older brother, Steve. As president, Evan is primarily responsible for the development and effective execution of the organization’s mission.

Jason Rose

Jason Rose

Jason Rose is co-founder of the Steve Fund and co-chair of its Youth Advisory Board.  As a high school senior, he focuses on promoting mental and emotional health of young people of color in  the transition to college.  He also focuses on communications for the Steve Fund.

Dr. Hazel Rose Markus

Dr. Hazel Rose Markus

Dr. Hazel Rose Markus is Markus Davis-Brack Professor in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University My focus is on people as socioculturally shaped shapers of their worlds. Specifically, my research examines various forms of culture including region of origin, race, ethnicity, gender, social class, and workplace and how they shape thought, feeling and action. Recent projects include a focus on how culture of national origin and social class influence psychological and physical health, how social class with the U.S. influences all aspects of education, and how first-generation to college students can successfully navigate the clash of independence and interdependence that arises on multicultural American campuses. I am a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a recipient of the American Psychological Association’s Award for Distinguished Scientific Contribution. I am also a Faculty Director of Stanford SPARQ: Social Psychological Answers to Real-world Questions, and director of Stanford’s Research Institute of the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. Recent books include: Doing Race: 21 Essays for the 21st Century; Facing Social Class: The Role of Societal Rank in Social Interaction, and Clash! How to Thrive in the Multicultural World.

Dr. Jeanne Tsai

Dr. Jeanne Tsai

Dr. Jeanne Tsai is an Associate Professor of Psychology at Stanford University and director of the Culture and Emotion Lab. Her research focuses on cultural influences on basic psychological and social processes related to emotion. She earned a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Stanford University in 1991 and a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of California, Berkeley in 1996.

Vanessa Volpe, M.A.

Vanessa Volpe, M.A.

Vanessa V. Volpe, M.A. is a Doctoral Candidate in Developmental Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She was honored to be named the 2015 Stephen C. Rose Legacy Scholar. Her research broadly focuses on the developmental significance of race-related experiences with a focus on the strengths that adolescents and young adults of color use to navigate these experiences. She directs a laboratory focused on the health of Black individuals and is the Principal Investigator of an ongoing mixed methods study of Black college students’ experiences at a predominantly white institution. Her dissertation work on explicating the processes through which coping strategies impact mental health has been supported by a grant from the American Psychological Association. She is privileged to work with several community-engaged programs in the public school district and university and to mentor future generations of change makers.

Daphne WatkinsDaphne C. Watkins, PhD is an Associate Professor at the University of Michigan, with faculty appointments in the School of Social Work, the School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry, and the Program for Research on Black Americans at the Institute for Social Research. Her research underscores the influence of gender role socialization on health status over the adult life course for marginalized men. To date, Dr. Watkins’ research has focused on understanding the social determinants of health that explain within group differences among black men; developing evidence-based strategies to improve the physical and mental health conditions of black men; and increasing knowledge about the intersection of age, culture, and gender. Dr. Watkins is an experienced mixed methods researcher who uses qualitative and quantitative data to increase knowledge about how intersecting social determinants and masculine ideologies place black men at high risk for poor health. Dr. Watkins received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and a PhD in Health Education from Texas A&M University. Prior to joining the University of Michigan School of Social Work and School of Medicine she completed a National Institute of Mental Health-sponsored (T32) postdoctoral fellowship at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan and a National Institutes of Health (K12) career development award in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Michigan Medical School. In addition to her academic positions, she is also the President of the American Men’s Studies Association; the first woman and person of color to ever serve as President in the organization’s 23-year history. Her research has received funding from the National Institutes of Health, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, and various university-based centers and institutes. Her scholarship includes over 40 peer-reviewed publications in scientific journals, 4 book chapters, and one mixed methods research book (Oxford University Press; July 2015). In addition to her scholarship, Dr. Watkins also co-directs a Gender and Health Research Lab and teaches Masters, Doctoral, and Continuing Education courses at the University of Michigan on research methods; program evaluation; mixed methods; and racial, ethnic, and gender issues in community-based interventions.